long-period variable

long-period variable

[′lȯŋ ‚pir·ē·əd ′ver·ē·ə·bəl]
(astronomy)
A variable star with a period from about 100 to more than 600 days.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mira is a long-period variable in the neck of Cetus, the Whale, that goes from one maximum to the next in about 332 days.
A third star in Cetus can occasionally become nearly as bright: the amazing long-period variable star Omicron ([omicron]) Ceti, also known as Mira (the Wonderful).
In 1906 December the VSS recorded the second brightest maximum of the prototype long-period variable star Mira (see Figure 29 for lightcurve).
The long-period variable R Aquarii, a red giant that's now coming into nice telescopic view in the southeast in late evening, finds itself having to do its slow, pulsing heartbeat meditations next to the tiny, eruptive fury of a severely troubled mate who throws things.
The neck of the Whale includes Mira, the most famous of the red long-period variable stars.
This seemed a logical thing to do since they were near S Delphini, a long-period variable I'd made 17 observations of in the previous year.
Often it won't be there at all; it's a long-period variable that spends some of its time as faint as 13th magnitude.
But S CorBor is just a typical long-period variable, like the much better known star Mira in the constellation Ceti.
There's the amazing long-period variable star Chi ([chi]) Cygni, which over a period of about 400 days ranges from around 13th magnitude to a maximum of 4th or 5th magnitude and back down.
These stars are Delta ([delta]) Cephei, which gives Cepheid variables their name, the eclipsing binary Algol in Perseus, and Mira (a long-period variable) in Cetus.
Barely a binocular field south of Alpha Peg, the red long-period variable star R Pegasi is brightening toward a predicted early-February maximum.