nursing home

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nursing home

1. a private hospital or residence staffed and equipped to care for aged or infirm persons
2. Brit a private maternity home

Nursing home

A building used for the lodging, boarding, and nursing care for patients of mental or physical incapacity who require care and related medical services less intense than those given in a hospital.

nursing home

A building or part thereof used for the lodging, boarding, and nursing care, on a 24-hr basis, of four or more persons who, because of mental or physical incapacity, may be unable to provide for their own needs and safety without the assistance of another person; provides facilities and services primarily for in-patients who require nursing care and related medical services less intense than those given in a general hospital or an extended-care facility.
References in periodicals archive ?
Findings from the study reported here are congruent with national guidelines and best-practice models that require long-term care facility staff to carefully assess the resident's need for an indwelling urinary catheter, develop individualized plans of care for catheter removal, and manage UI with a variety of evidence-based interventions that do not include a long-term indwelling urinary catheter (e.g., scheduled or prompted voiding, judicious medication use for overactive bladder or urgency UI, behavioral strategies) (CDC/ National Healthcare Safety Network, 2009; CMS, 2005; Newman & Wein, 2009), as indicated by the sharp decrease in indwelling urinary catheter use found from admission to quarter four.
(2010) observed that some obese long-term care facility residents and their caregivers may prefer indwelling urinary catheters over other incontinence control strategies to minimize the day-to-day bathing and skin care challenges associated with using absorbent pads and reduce barriers to engaging with others residents.
Finally, male long-term care facility residents were more likely than female long-term care facility residents to have an indwelling urinary catheter, and African-American long-term care facility residents were more likely than Caucasian long-term care facility residents to have an indwelling urinary catheter.
This study examined the association between indwelling urinary catheter usage and obesity among long-term care facility residents.
The type of admission to the long-term care facility may have an impact on the presence of an indwelling urinary catheter; data from residents admitted from acute care facilities may have a higher prevalence of indwelling urinary catheter than those admitted from home.
A long-term care facility should conduct a search under such a policy only when necessary, with the written authorization of senior management, and with as much sensitivity to employees' privacy concerns as is reasonable under the circumstances.
Drug-testing laws vary from state to state, and a long-term care facility should seek legal counsel in drafting its drug testing policy to ensure compliance with local law.
A long-term care facility may ask ah applicant about his or her criminal record and may deny employment to a convicted felon, if the conviction is related to the job duties.
A long-term care facility should consult with legal counsel before establishing any employment testing requirements.
The challenge of adjusting to relocation at a long-term care facility, however, is complicated by the presence of concurrent losses.
Some of the most common difficulties in adapting to life in a long-term care facility are a decrease in independence, being uncomfortable with other residents, missing their previous home and being uncomfortable with the new environment.

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