longitudinal magnetoresistance

longitudinal magnetoresistance

[‚län·jə′tüd·ən·əl mag¦ned·ō·ri′zis·təns]
(electromagnetism)
The change of electrical resistance produced in a current-carrying metal or semiconductor upon application of a magnetic field parallel to the current flow.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Figure 4 shows the oscillations of the longitudinal magnetoresistance in Si at different temperatures and pressures.
Influence of Nonparabolicity Energy Bands on the Oscillations Longitudinal Magnetoresistance in Narrow-Gap Semiconductors
The recent prediction and experimental realization of standard type-I Weyl fermions in semimetals by two groups in Princeton and one group in IOP Beijing showed that the resistivity can actually decrease if the electric field is applied in the same direction as the magnetic field, an effect called negative longitudinal magnetoresistance. The new work shows that materials hosting a type-II Weyl fermion have mixed behavior: While for some directions of magnetic fields the resistivity increases just like in normal metals, for other directions of the fields, the resistivity can decrease like in the Weyl semimetals, offering possible technological applications.

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