longitudinal recording

longitudinal recording

The common method of digital recording on a magnetic material. The bits are laid out end to end, and the direction of the magnetic charge is horizontal with respect to the medium.


Longitudinal vs. Perpendicular
Longitudinal recording is the traditional way bits have been recorded on disk platters. (Image courtesy of Hitachi Global Storage Technologies.)
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References in periodicals archive ?
The technology stands data bits vertically onto the disc media, rather than horizontal to the surface as with traditional longitudinal recording, to deliver new levels of hard drive data density, capacity and reliability.
This enables more data on a given disk than is possible with conventional longitudinal recording, and provides a platform for future expansion of hard drive densities.
The new product has enabled a drastic increase in the media capacity compared with conventional products based on the longitudinal recording technology.
While the hard drive industry has been using longitudinal recording successfully for five decades, it is now within two product generations of reaching its practical limit.
That's using so-called longitudinal recording, the conventional technology, in which the magnetic orientations of bits lie in the plane of the disk.
Longitudinal recording media have a fixed number of parallel tracks (e.g., 18 tracks for 3480 tape cartridges) laid across the length of the tape that are written to or read from the beginning of the tape to its end.
From there to about 100 Gb/[in.sup.2], different compositions of cobalt-based alloys are going to be required, and they will be much more complex materials, but they will allow longitudinal recording to go to the higher densities.
Longitudinal recording: The magnetic recording technology used in the majority of hard disk drives today.
For the past 40 years, longitudinal recording has been used to record information on a disc drive.
1991 The tape industry embraces many new formats including linear, helical, and narrow-track longitudinal recording. Tape libraries are now produced by more than fifteen different companies.
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