loose

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loose

1. 
a. (of the bowels) emptying easily, esp excessively; lax
b. (of a cough) accompanied by phlegm, mucus, etc.
2. the loose Rugby the part of play when the forwards close round the ball in a ruck or loose scrum
References in periodicals archive ?
The problem - and as editor of Construction Week, I mean this in the loosest sense of the word - is that the UAE is home to so many pavement-blocking construction projects.
Wrapped in dovish language, theFederal Reserve has just embarked on what will be the loosest tightening in its history," said Mohamed El-Erian, chief economic advisor at Allianz in Newport Beach, California.
In sum, it will be the loosest tightening in the modern history of central banking," the economist said.
In summary, using the loosest rules the winner is the list of 1 of any book or the 6 of Fadiman's 10.
Sunk and the title track have some of the playground chant cheek of the Tom Tom Club washed in dub reverb and are the loosest, most danceable tracks here.
But this course of events could only be considered a plot in the loosest conception of the term.
Days when the East Europeans had ladies, in the loosest sense of the word, with deep voices and industrialstrength Immac, who could hurl shot puts with the ease of a field gun.
And ruling over this motley crew is headmistress Ms Baron (Frances de la Tour), who is the loosest cannon of all.
Bolt, of Rogers, was a businessman only in the loosest sense of the word.
However, to postulate the argument for ex gratia payments is inappropriate as it could introduce a new compensation culture based on the loosest of principles.
But, for many books, this is only the very loosest sort of translation.
In Priestland's analysis farmers have been replaced by merchants (that is, capitalists, financial and industrial) and men of prayer become sages (the loosest of his three categories, elastic enough to encompass everything from the traditional roles of priests and philosophers, to scientists, bureaucrats, writers, artists etc).