lordosis

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Related to lordotic: kyphotic, Lordotic curvature

lordosis

[lȯr‚dō·səs]
(medicine)
Exaggerated forward curvature of the lumbar spine.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Effect of age and lordotic angle on the level of lumbar disc herniation.
(4) Lordotic angle (LA): There are two tangents estimated relating to the surface of the back.
Educated strength and conditioning specialists know that sound squat form involves maintaining a lordotic curve, tracking the knees over the toes with minimal mediolateral movement, and keeping the heels in contact with the ground (28).
Subjects with lower maxillary length were associated with a more lordotic cervical curve.
Anatomical leg length inequality, scoliosis and lordotic curve in unselected clinic patients.
As compared to flexion, maintaining a posture of extension during work hours is quite unusual, though prolonged orthostatic periods tend to increase the lordotic curve.
The effects of partial and complete masculinization on the sexual differentiation of nuclei that control lordotic behavior in the male rat.
Affection of lumbar lordotic curve often results in sagittal spinal imbalance causing low back pain that represents one of the leading causes of disability [3].
Because in anatomic position the pelvis/sacrum is anteriorly tilted approximately 30 degrees, there is a natural lordotic curve to the lumbar spine.
The VEO Direct Lateral System offers a comprehensive portfolio of interbody implants in both parallel and lordotic angles to match each patient's anatomy.
Figure 1 illustrates this concept and shows that the bending moment on the passive tissues of the spine is high when a person adopts a fully flexed posture (approaching 100% lumbar flexion) at the start of a lift (Figure 1B) compared to someone who adopts a lordotic posture (Figure 1A--approximately 40% flexion).
Dr Ozdemir said that in the sense of a deformity, kyphosis is the pathological curving of the spine, where parts of the spinal column lose some or all of their lordotic profile, causing a bowing of the back, seen as a slouching posture.