loss factor


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loss factor

[′lȯs ‚fak·tər]
(electricity)
The power factor of a material multiplied by its dielectric constant; determines the amount of heat generated in a material.
References in periodicals archive ?
Recently the step curing and continuous curing techniques involving measurement of electrical properties like dielectric constant, loss factor, are also reported in the literature (refs.
The authors have developed a 2-dimensional numerical model to represent the microwave curing of a single lap adhesive-bonded joint with adherends having low dielectric loss factor.
The key engineering properties are the static shear modulus (G stat), the dynamic shear modulus (G') and the loss factor (tangent delta).
Building attributes include an efficient floor plan with 26,000 s/f floor plates, low common area loss factor, high parking ratio and access to multiple fiber providers.
The loss factor is related to the material's energy dissipation.
Because of the resonant nature of EM crystals, the loss factor must be minimized for efficient operation.
Strain amplitude dependence of dynamic shear modulus (G [prime]) and loss factor (tan [Delta]) of the original samples are illustrated in figure 8 (a) and (b).
1 billion dollars worth of commercial property was sold in Manhattan in 2005 (2)), the first action taken by his sales agent is to increase the full floor Loss Factor to 25%.
Figure 9 shows the loss factor as a function of temperature of POM, modified POM blends and POE.
This difference is considered as an extra loss factor caused by the environment.
Damping loss factor measurements of carbon fiber panels were performed in the laser vibrometer laboratory.