loss

(redirected from losses)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Wikipedia.
Related to losses: Hysteresis losses

loss

1. Electronics a measure of the power lost in an electrical system expressed as the ratio of or difference between the input power and the output power
2. at a loss at less than the cost of buying, producing, or maintaining (something)

loss

[lȯs]
(communications)
(engineering)
Power that is dissipated in a device or system without doing useful work. Also known as internal loss.

loss

(jargon)
Something (not a person) that loses; a situation in which something is losing. Emphatic forms include "moby loss", and "total loss", "complete loss". Common interjections are "What a loss!" and "What a moby loss!" Note that "moby loss" is OK even though **"moby loser" is not used; applied to an abstract noun, moby is simply a magnifier, whereas when applied to a person it implies substance and has positive connotations.

Compare lossage.
References in periodicals archive ?
They reported an association between heating loss and the duration of hemodialysis; hearing losses occurred in 30% of patients who had been on hemodialysis for 18 months or less and in 67% of those who had been on hemodialysis for more than 18 months.
851 (expressing concerns about the extent to which currency gains and losses could be recognized under the proposed 1991 regulations).
Even after many industry loss warranties were triggered by Katrina, the hedge funds were not scared off by losses and have written even more business, Nicolini said.
Basically, capital losses are used first to offset capital gains.
Production changes: Cleaning equipment prior to using it for another product can cause multi-day losses.
The losses cannot be offset against actively earned income such as salary or port folio income such a interest and dividends.
As mentioned earlier, presbycusis can significantly affect speech comprehension, particularly if severe losses of heating occur.
Coupled with information about the incidence and prevalence of vision loss, hearing loss, and deaf-blindness, it is possible to project a steady increase in the number of older adults with vision and hearing losses.
When you're developing your list of risk and insurance objectives, you'll need to look at three loss areas: the operating asset, the associated loss from operating interruptions and the losses to third parties who suffer as a result of the operating asset loss.
These losses rarely involve the numbness stage for more than a brief time, unless the grief is for the loss of a practice or a crippling attack on the physician's social or economic status, as happens with malpractice suits.