lossy material

lossy material

[′lȯs·ē mə′tir·ē·əl]
(physics)
A material that dissipates energy of electromagnetic or acoustic energy passing through it.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Physical or geometrical tapering of the lossy material is a type of broadband impedance-matching technique to minimize the reflections at the interfaces in the required pass band.
Above-mentioned theory Section 2.1 is valid only for the thick lossy material (solid absorbers), which can be modeled as an infinite-section transmission line.
It should be noted that no ground plane is added in the proposed design, since the body (or any lossy material) will act as a reflector to the antenna [23].
We note that for highly dispersive lossy material, the values of the real and imaginary parts of ([omega][epsilon])' and ([omega][mu])' can be less than [[epsilon].sub.0] and [[mu].sub.0], respectively, and even less than or equal to zero.
In principle, the Bode-Fano networks create a lossless multi-resonance antenna rather than a single resonance antenna with highly dispersive lossy material required by the lower bound in (57).
Typical samples are up to a few centimeters thick and are not made of porous or lossy materials.
Even metal surfaces are more interfering and act as lossy materials. Not only the parent material affects the radiation but even the surrounding objects cause considerable loss.
Commercial eigenmode solvers have never been stress-tested for their use with lossy materials. Indeed, the stress-testing of commercial electromagnetic full-wave simulation software packages is of critical importance to both the academic community and industry; as previously undertaken for the modeling of electrically-thin metal-walled structures [11] and those intended for use at terahertz frequencies [12].
Also, commercial eigenmode solvers have not been stress-tested for their use with very lossy materials. Our paper addresses both issues in an exact and traceable way.
In simulation and test board evaluations, Gore has found the loss performance of hybrid stripline transmission lines to be as good as or better than homogeneous striplines fabricated with mid-range lossy materials with a dissipation factor of 0.008.
This option models the temperature rise in lossy materials due to heating.
The module treats modeling of inhomogeneous waveguides, anisotropic materials and lossy materials. It also handles complex variables and complex coefficients as input data for modeling in the frequency domain.