finder

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finder

finder, in law. Ordinarily the finder of lost property is entitled to retain it against anyone except the owner. It is larceny, however, for the finder to keep the property if he knows or can easily determine who owns it. In some places the finder must deliver the lost object to the police; if it is unclaimed within a prescribed period it becomes his property. Lost objects that are embedded in the soil, e.g., a deeply buried ring, belong to the landowner even if another finds them. On the other hand, objects found in a privately owned place to which the public has the right of access, e.g., a hotel, belong to the finder and not to the owner of the realty. The purchaser of an article that, without his knowledge, has something of value concealed in it, e.g., money in a desk, is legally the finder, not the owner, of the valuable. See treasure-trove.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2022, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.

finder

A low-power telescope with a wide field of view that has its optical axis aligned with that of the main telescope. It is used to locate an object to be observed and facilitate the training of the main telescope on that object. Because the field of view of the average amateur astronomer's telescope used at its lowest power is only about half a degree, some means of pointing it in the correct direction is needed. Setting circles enable this to be done with a permanent equatorial mounting but for a portable or a simple altazimuth mounting a finder is essential. It should have a field of view of at least four to eight degrees and be provided with illuminated cross wires or a graticule.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Finder

 

in astronomy, an auxiliary wide-angle tube immovably attached to a larger telescope and used to locate a celestial object and fix the larger telescope on it. The optic axes of the finder and the telescope are parallel; the cross hairs are placed in the finder’s field of view for more precise aiming of the telescope.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

finder

[′fīnd·ər]
(communications)
An optical or electronic device that shows the field of action covered by a television camera.
Switch or relay group in telephone switching systems that selects the path which the call is to take through the system; operates under the instruction of the calling station's dial.
(optics)
A small telescope having a wide-angle lens and low power, which is attached to a larger telescope and points in the same direction; used to locate objects that are to be viewed in the larger telescope.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

finder

1. Physics a small low-power wide-angle telescope fitted to a more powerful larger telescope, used to locate celestial objects to be studied by the larger instrument
2. Photog short for viewfinder
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Finder

(operating system)
The part of the Macintosh Operating System and GUI that simulates the desktop. The multitasking version of Finder was called "MultiFinder" until multitasking was integrated into the core of the OS with the introduction of System 7.0 in 1990.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

Finder

The part of the Mac operating system that gives it the Mac "look and feel." It also provides file management (copy, delete, rename files) and control of the desktop icons, windows, Clipboard and Scrapbook as well as the application startup interface. The Finder resides in the System folder. See MultiFinder.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
There has been a lot of interest and the restaurant is in an excellent position Paul Ellis, chef at Lost Property
The lost property department on average gets at least a couple of items every day - but just don't mention the rain to Julie: "Yes, the worst time is when it is raining, as we're swamped with umbrellas."
Many cards lost on the Tube, DLR and Overground went to TfL's lost property offices
"All items which are not perishable are stored in a secure lost property office for three months so that people can come back and collect them.
But that is not a one-off, because police forces in Wales and England no longer deal with lost property.
Lost property is managed on behalf of the airport by Excess Baggage Group Ltd, who insist the fee has 'remained unchanged since 2001' and is 'standard' across most UK airports.
THE new rail franchise operator has revealed it will not impose lost property charges like Arriva Trains Wales when it takes on the Wales and Borders service.
The upper limit of the fees that train companies can charge for reclaimed lost property is set out in the National Rail Conditions of Travel.
POLICE are to stop dealing with lost property in a cost-cutting move.