lotus-eater

(redirected from Lotus Eater)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms.

lotus-eater

Greek myth one of a people encountered by Odysseus in North Africa who lived in indolent forgetfulness, drugged by the fruit of the legendary lotus
References in periodicals archive ?
Though a more credible, if more dour, character than the callow Miranda, Helen Adams, the photojournalist protagonist of Tatjani Soli's novel The Lotus Eaters, shares her earlier fictional sister's ill-defined motivation for going to the war as well as her initially dubious credentials as a journalist.
When the lotus eaters appear, a car, helpfully labelled Lotus, is wheeled on.
When the lotus eaters begin to degrade all that was so costly won and the weaknesses begin to become apparent, the lotus eaters build walls to deter the advance of the barbarian.
Wood had this to say about the story's lotus eaters, who are rendered blissfully idle after eating the flesh of the fruit: "Look at those people sitting at bars - those are the lotus-eaters.
Homer refers to Odysseus spending time in the land of the Lotus Eaters, and approaching the underworld through fields of asphodel.
Djerba is the legendary land of the Lotus Eaters, so hospitable that when Ulysses stopped off he had trouble getting his crew to leave for the rest of their Odyssey.
They are, of course, the duo responsible for the Genie Award-winner, The Lotus Eaters.
She sings a ballad for the very tired and very sad lotus eaters.
Reflecting a ground-breaking approach to vocal writing, Beat Furrer's LotEfagos for soprano and double-bass was written in 2006 and premiered by the very same artist who will give its Cyprus premiere as part of the festival -- the double-bassist Uli Fussenegger of Klangforum Wien who, this time, will be joining forces with French soprano Helene Fauchere to present a composition based on Jose Eungel Valente's poem describing Ulysses' companions and their adventure on the island of the lotus eaters.
We have "traveled" to Vietnam, China, Italy, Ukraine, England, Burma, and India, while delving into The Lotus Eaters by Tatjana Soli, The Glassblower of Murano by Marina Fiorato, Everything is Illuminated by Jonathan Safran Foer, Major Pettigrew's Last Stand by Helen Simonson, The Art of Hearing Heartbeats by Jan-Philipp Sendker, and The Good Wife by Anne Cherian.
With everything laid on, lotus eaters might be tempted to lie back and enjoy it all.