lotus-eater


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lotus-eater

Greek myth one of a people encountered by Odysseus in North Africa who lived in indolent forgetfulness, drugged by the fruit of the legendary lotus
References in periodicals archive ?
The people who lived there gave some of the Greeks the fruit of the lotus flower, which proved to be "so delicious that those who ate of it left off caring about home, and did not even want to go back and say what had happened to them, but were for staying and munching lotus with the Lotus-eaters without thinking further" about going home.
Today's lotus-eaters come to relax on miles of soft, sandy beaches under the shade of a million date palm trees.
* lotus-eaters: Tearless out as roulette's astute loser, a soul tester, eases rut lot, sets a lure to restate soul.
JOIN THE LOTUS-EATERS Travel from the edge of the Sahara Desert through lush oases to the Mediterranean coast of Tunisia.
The mood in Gifford's work of experiencing the beauty of the natural world at a veiled remove from the world of lower concerns parallels this mid-nineteenth century occupation of escaping the world-weary everyday of city life." Travel writer George Curtis, with whom Gifford was acquainted, described the travelers who flocked to these natural resorts as Lotus-Eaters, a title borrowed from Tennyson's poem of the same name.
Fowler is content, with nary an opinion on Vietnam's political turmoil that would mar his personal land of the lotus-eaters. Content, that is, until Pyle threatens both to take Phuong away and forever change the country itself.
My men went on and presently met the Lotus-Eaters, nor did these Lotus-Eaters have any thoughts of destroying our companions, but they only gave them lotus to taste of.
Kling also envisions the piece on a mythic scale, blending elements of Shakespeare, turn-of-the-century melodrama, American musicals and Homer (he and Sommers sprinkle clever references to The Odyssey throughout, including an island of lotus-eaters populated by fuzzy rat-puppets, and a Circe-like enchantress who rises our of a mythical bayou graveyard).
Anna Robertson Brown, ~The Lotus Symbolism in Homer, Theocritus, Moschus, Tennyson, and Browning' (ii.625-34), pages 628-30 are on ~The Lotus-Eaters' and ~Choric Song'.