lotus-eaters


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lotus-eaters

or

Lotophagi

(lətŏf`əjī'), a fabulous people who occupied the north coast of Africa and lived on the lotus, which brought forgetfulness and happy indolence. They appear in the Odyssey. When Odysseus landed among them, some of his men ate the food. They forgot their friends and home and had to be dragged back to the ships. "The Lotus-Eaters" by Tennyson has become a classic of English poetry.
References in periodicals archive ?
Today's lotus-eaters come to relax on miles of soft, sandy beaches under the shade of a million date palm trees.
For him there is no great distance between unbridled democracy and the expansionist quest for luxury: the democratic man is one who has taken up his abode in the land of the Lotus-Eaters, driven by useless desires, among which is the desire for food more exotic than the bread and cakes necessary for sustenance.
Diplomacy is usually stereotyped as the fine art of wining and dining and diplomats as the lotus-eaters.
Painful cuts from the original work include the Lotus-Eaters, the Phaecia Nausicaa, the Sirens and even Odysseus' father, Laertes.
In Books IX-XII Odysseus recounts for the Phaeacians his adventures since leaving Troy: he first comes to the land of the Lotus-Eaters and struggles with lotus-induced lethargy; he blinds Polyphemus the Cyclops, a son of Poseidon; he loses 11 of his 12 ships to the cannibalistic Laestrygones and reaches the island of the enchantress Circe, who has turned some of his companions into swine.
Lotus-eater out-relates stale route 'Real' set out.