Loudness

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loudness

[′lau̇d·nəs]
(acoustics)
The magnitude of the physiological sensation produced by a sound, which varies directly with the physical intensity of sound but also depends on frequency of sound and waveform.

Loudness

 

a quantity that characterizes auditory sensations for a given sound. Loudness depends in a complex way on sound pressure (or sound intensity), frequency, and form of vibrations. Where frequency and form of vibrations are constant, loudness increases with an increase in sound pressure. Where sound pressure is the same, the loudness of pure tones (harmonic oscillations) of different frequencies is different—that is, at different frequencies sounds of different intensity can have the same loudness. The loudness of a given frequency is evaluated by comparing it with the loudness of a simple tone of 1.000 hertz (Hz) frequency. The sound pressure level (in decibels [dB]) of a pure tone of 1,000 Hz frequency that is as loud (audially) as the tone being measured is called the loudness level of the given sound (in phons). Loudness for complex sounds is rated on an arbitrary scale in sones. Loudness is an important characteristic of musical sound.

loudness

The intensive attribute of an auditory sensation, in terms of which sounds may be rank-ordered on a scale extending from soft to loud; depends primarily on sound pressure, but also on the frequency and wave form of the sound stimulus; expressed in units called sones; 2 sones is just twice as loud as 1 sone.

Loudness

boiler factory
proverbial source of noise and confusion. [Am. Culture: Misc.]
breaking of the sound barrier
boom of plane heard exceeding speed of about 750 m.p.h. or Mach 1. [Aviation: Misc.]
Concorde
supersonic jet of British-French design. [Eur. Hist.: EB, III: 66]
Joshua
Jericho walls razed by clamorous blasts from his troops’ trumpets. [O.T.: Joshua 6]
Krakatoa
volcanic explosion on this Indonesian island heard 3000 miles away (1883). [Asian Hist.: NCE, 1500]
Olivant
Roland’s horn, whose blast kills birds and is heard by Charlemagne, eight miles away. [Fr. Legend: Brewer Dictionary, 772]
sonic boom
shock wave from plane breaking the speed of sound. [Aviation: Misc.]
Stentor
Greek herald with voice of 50 men. [Gk. Myth.: Espy, 39]
References in periodicals archive ?
Experiments on other noise sources show that louder sounds are more annoying.
They forget to keep speaking louder the minute they have left the therapy room," said Huber.
Our source went on: "Eventually she walked back to the Louder Lounge wearing massive sunglasses, a parka and wellies, surfacing at around 2.45pm."
Sydney, June 29 (ANI): Former tennis great Chris Evert has admitted that she'd have trouble playing with the "louder, shriller" grunting now emitted by some leading women tennis players.
Lately I can hear the ticking of my biological clock getting louder and louder.
"They were getting louder and louder and everyone was looking at them.
Faint, echolike noises generated by the inner ear are louder in heterosexual women than in homosexual or bisexual women, report researchers from the University of Texas at Austin.
The study on the iPod-listening-generation also showed that teen boys listen louder than teen girls.
Then the middle of the stand responded and so it went, back and forth, back and forth, louder and louder.
Then he started laughing louder than anyone." Clinton made no mention of gay or lesbian issues in his remarks.
Greenwood added: "We started reversing and the car just started revving up louder and louder as we were going faster and faster backwards.
In contrast, the researchers found, children with SLI could not hear any of the test tones unless the tones were substantially louder than those played for the control children.