werewolf

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Related to loup-garou: lycanthrope, werewolf, Werewolves

werewolf:

see lycanthropylycanthropy
, in folklore, assumption by a human of the appearance and characteristics of an animal. Ancient belief in lycanthropy was widespread, and it still exists in parts of the world.
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Werewolf

 

in folk belief, a man who allegedly has the ability to transform himself into a beast or, more rarely, into a bush, stone, or similar object. In the popular beliefs of European peoples, a werewolf is a sorcerer who has taken the form of a wolf or an ordinary man who has been turned into a wolf by a magic spell. Analogous popular beliefs are known to exist among the peoples of India, where instead of a wolf the beast is a tiger; in Africa, it is a leopard or hyena; and in South America, it is a jaguar.”

werewolf

a man transformed into a wolf. [Eur. Folklore: Benét, 1082]

werewolf

a person fabled in folklore and superstition to have been changed into a wolf by being bewitched or said to be able to assume wolf form at will

Werewolf

(dreams)
A werewolf is a creature that does not exist in the physical world. He is symbolic of a man who turns into a monster, a normal person who transforms into a bloodthirsty animal. The werewolf may represent something in your life or in your own personality. When interpreting this dream, consider internal and external factors that generally seem normal but have a tendency to transform into undesirable, hurtful, or dangerous concerns in your life.
References in periodicals archive ?
La Vita Ronani et les contes de loup-garou auxXIIe et XIIIe siecles.
A Lycanthropy Reader: Werewolves in Western Culture (Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 1986), 45-91; and in greater detail in Gael Milin, Les chiens de Dieu: La representation du loup-garou en Occident (Xle-XIX siecles), Centre de Recherche Bretonne et Celtique: Cahiers de Bretagne Occidentale 13 (Brest, France: Universite de Bretagne Occidentale 1993), 117-166.
Adam Douglas, The Beast Within: A History of the Werewolf New York: Avon, 1992); Laurence Harf-Lancner, "La metamorphose illusoire: Des theories chretiennes de la metamorphose aux images medievales du loup-garou," Annales Economies Societes Civilisations 40 (1985): 208-226; Sophie Houdard, "Le loup-garou ou les limites de l'animalite," in Jean de Nynauld, De la lycanthropie, transformation et extase des sorciers (1615), edition critique augmentee d etudes sur les lycanthropes et les loupsgarous, ed.
Additional studies of the priest and the werewolves of Ossory are Menard, "Histoires de loup-garou," 215216; Jeanne-Marie Boivin, "Le pretre et les loups-garous: Un episode de la Topographia Hibernica de Giraud de Barri," in Metamorphose et bestiaire fantastique au Moyen Age, ed.
The twelfth- and thirteenth-century fascination with tales of werewolves is also noted in Menard, "Histoires de loup-garou," 20; and Joyce E.
For discussion, see Menard, "Histoires de loup-garou," 217-218; and Salisbury, Beast Within.
Faure, "Le Bisclavret de Marie de France: Une histoire suspecte de loup-garou," Revues des Langues Romanes 83 (1978): 345-356; and Francois Suard, "Bisclavret et les contes du loup-garou: Essai d'interpretation," Marche Romane 30 (1980): 267-276.
For a full discussion of the loss-of-clothes motif, which can be traced to the Satyricon of Petronius, see Menard, "Histoires de loup-garou," 211-213, 219-221.
En quelque sorte si le dedoublement frere-soeur n'est pas encore tout a fait rassurant, la transformation en loup-garou assure la rupture definitive d'avec l'humain.