lourie

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lourie

, loerie
South African any of several species of touraco: louries are divided into two groups, the arboreal species having a mainly green plumage and crimson wings and the species which inhabits the more open savanna areas having a plain grey plumage
References in periodicals archive ?
1940, the Nazi invasion: Lourie flees France with his third wife, Ella, a countess and great-granddaughter of Vastly Zhukovsky.
Lourie pins his hopes on the US musical-artistic emigre community: Koussevitsky, the expressionist artist and set designer Mstislav Dobuzhinsky, later Leopold Stokowski, but without success.
1949: Lourie to Graham, while recruiting her services: "I had thought to attract Sirin [Nabokov], he liked the topic, but he's very busy and what's more I no longer think I could have gotten along with him: he's very capricious and I am capricious, and what I need is cooperation .
Lourie to Jacques Maritain: "ils n'arriveront pas a m'etouffer de leurs silence" (March 1).
1961: Lourie writes to Maritain that he disapproves of turning his Blackamoor opera into an orchestral suite, although Boston Symphony is willing to do fragments in concert form; he is holding out for one entire scene, with three solo voices and a small chorale.
1961: Lourie and Ella move to Jacques Maritain's house in Princeton.
Concert suite performed successfully; Lourie is ecstatic.
1962: Lourie to Maritain: "The City Opera a refuse de montrer le Blackamoor.
1963: Lourie to Maritain: "La Metropolitain opera m'a fait savoir qui'ils on trouves le libretto de "Blackamoor" admirable
Apan [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] [The Blackamoor of Peter the Great] (1949-63), an opera by Arthur Vincent Lourie and librettist Irina Graham (d.
In Lourie, Korsakov, the dandy freshly arrived from Paris, will replace Pushkin's Valerian.
Sustained in friendship first by Koussevitsky (whose ghostwriter he was) and then by Jacques Maritain, Lourie never grasped the profoundly non-European needs, tastes, and pulse of his American place of exile.