louver


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louvre

(US), louver
1. 
a. any of a set of horizontal parallel slats in a door or window, sloping outwards to throw off rain and admit air
b. the slats together with the frame supporting them
2. Architect a lantern or turret that allows smoke to escape
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Louver

A window opening made up of overlapping boards, blades or slats, either fixed or adjustable, designed to allow ventilation in varying degrees without letting the sun or rain come in.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

louver

[′lü·vər]
(building construction)
An opening in a wall or ceiling with slanted or sloping slats to allow sunlight and ventilation and exclude rain; may be fixed or adjustable, and may be at the opening of a ventilating duct. Also known as outlet ventilator.
(engineering)
Any arrangement of fixed or adjustable slatlike openings to provide ventilation.
(engineering acoustics)
An arrangement of concentric or parallel slats or equivalent grille members used to conceal and protect a loudspeaker while allowing sound waves to pass.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

louver

Louis XVI style
1. An assembly of sloping, overlapping blades or slats; may be fixed or adjustable; designed to admit air and/or light in varying degrees and to exclude rain and snow; esp. used in doors, windows, and the intake and discharge of mechanical ventilation systems.
2. A dome or turret rising from the roof of the hall of a medieval English residence, originally open at the sides to
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

louver

A slotted opening in the structure that acts as an inlet of air. The amount of air may be controlled by opening or closing the openings in the louver.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
A small portion of the exhaust air is recirculated at area between other side parapet louvers and second rows other side cooling towers intake louvers.
In household refrigerators, the freezer air duct is composed of two components, fan louver and evaporator cover, as illustrated in Figure 3.
Upon winter startup of the engine-generator package, the intake louver (MD-2) and radiator discharge louver (MD-3) remain closed, while the recirculation damper (MD-4 & 5) and combustion air damper (MD1) are both open.
When the louver is set flush or recessed, the vulnerable joint ends up inside the wall.
During the 1970s and '80s, the best argument for using parabolic louvers was energy savings.
One area where the shift is occuring is in creating extra-wide louvers. Says Stuart L Williams, manager, customer support, Murata Wiedemann Inc, King of Prussia, PA, "We've designed machines to produce extended-width louvers for the heating and air-conditioning industry.
The air handling unit design upon which this study is based is a draw-through, single-zone type with louvered outdoor air intake, mixing plenum, filter, chilled water cooling coil and fan in a field erected casing of prefabricated insulated panels (Fig.
"The Louver House's location has attracted buyers looking to be minutes from Manhattan and closer to Williamsburg's waterfront and Bedford Avenue.
What's the deal with the louvers on the condenser air outlet on the 36,000 BTU horizontal environmental control unit (ECU), NGN 4120-01467-2638?
One of the Weinig moulders there, a Unimat, is dedicated to processing louver blanks.
Ice will form first at any of the air/water interfaces in the cooling tower, such as the inlet louver area.