low-energy electron diffraction


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low-energy electron diffraction

[′lō ‚en·ər·jē i‚lek‚trän di′frak·shən]
(solid-state physics)
A technique for studying the atomic structure of single crystal surfaces, in which electrons of uniform energy in the approximate range 5-500 electronvolts are scattered from a surface, and those scattered electrons that have lost no energy are selected and accelerated to a fluorescent screen where the diffraction pattern from the surface can be observed. Abbreviated LEED.
References in periodicals archive ?
Subsequent chapters address the theory of crystalline elemental solids and their surfaces, experimental surface methods, low-energy electron diffraction, and photoelectron spectroscopy and diffraction, among other topics.
This includes an ellipsometer and an integrated low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) system, which will monitor thin-film deposition to increase the efficiency and productivity of the lab's research into nano-structured materials.
At -183 [degrees] C, about half of the outermost surface molecules were essentially invisible to the technique they used, low-energy electron diffraction.
Photoelectron spectroscopy, thermally stimulated desorption, and low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) are used to determine the molecular geometries of the polymers and examine the environments surrounding the electrons.
Among specific topics are low-energy electron diffraction, electron-impact secondary neutral mass spectrometry, elastic recoil detection analysis, grazing incidence X-ray methods for near-surface structural studies, sum frequency generation spectroscopy, and scanning near-field optical microscopy.

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