low-power television station

low-power television station

[′lō ¦pau̇·ər ′tel·ə‚vish·ən ‚stā·shən]
(communications)
A television broadcasting facility limited in transmitter output so as to provide reception in only a local area, with a typical service area radius of 3-16 miles (5-26 kilometers). Abbreviated LPTV station.
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NYSE: HCHC) has agreed to acquire all assets of Texas, US-based low-power television station (LPTV) owner Mako Communications, LLC and certain of its affiliates, the company said.
I was the news director--actually, the whole news department--at a small, no-budget, low-power television station in Arizona.
Another part of the plan was the construction of a local low-power television station - as a broadcaster rather than a cable channel, the new affiliate would qualify for Nielsen ratings, with increased revenues and increased viewership.
WNYZ-LP broadcasts on the audio portion of a low-power television station on VHF channel 6.
NYSE:UVN) broadcast television network, today announced that it has expanded its reach to the growing North Carolina Hispanic community through its acquisition of WIWW, a low-power television station in Durham, North Carolina.
WAWA, a low-power television station, is now the only UPN over-the-air television station in the Syracuse market.
With the use of cameras, message signs and fiber optics, this "smart" highway can detect travel times and provide information to motorists not only with the message signs on the highways, but also via the Internet, mobile Internet and a low-power television station.
As of 28 February 2017, it owned and/or operated 4 television stations and 5 low-power television stations serving 2 markets; and 68 FM and 32 AM radio stations serving 24 markets.
The FCC has created procedures for low-power television stations (LPTVs) and translators to apply for a Special Displacement Window if they are being forced off the air by the incentive auction.
Saga owns or operates broadcast properties in 26 markets, including 65 FM and 32 AM radio stations, 1 state radio network, 4 television stations and five low-power television stations.
The pair falsely claimed to investors that Vision Broadcast owned low-power television stations as well as 70 broadcast licenses to operate additional low-power television stations estimated to be worth $400 million once the television stations became operational.
The auction included most of the company's 19 full-power and 85 low-power television stations.