lower atmosphere

lower atmosphere

[′lō·ər ′at·mə‚sfir]
(meteorology)
That part of the atmosphere in which most weather phenomena occur (that is, the troposphere and lower stratosphere); in other contexts, the term implies the lower troposphere.

lower atmosphere

The atmosphere may be divided into two parts viz. the lower and the upper atmosphere. The tropopause and the troposphere are known as the lower atmosphere. It is that part of the atmosphere in which most weather phenomena occur. The region above the tropopause is called the upper atmosphere.
References in classic literature ?
5) Aether is the bright, untainted upper atmosphere, as distinguished from Aer, the lower atmosphere of the earth.
These winter rains helped in washing away the pollutants, which were suspended in the lower atmosphere since many days.
Suspended matter accumulates in the lower atmosphere, colliding with water vapour which causes a chain reaction that produces smog.
They found higher-than-expected levels of brown carbon and much less black carbon at this upper level of the atmosphere, 5-12 kilometers above Earth's surface, and determined that the brown carbon is carried by smoke plumes to the lower atmosphere, where it mixes with clouds and is brought to the upper atmosphere by deep convection.
org/public/news/eso1729/) European Southern Observatory explained that when it is concentrated enough, it acts as a barrier that stops heat from entering or exiting, which would make the upper atmosphere of this exoplanet hotter than the lower atmosphere - a reversal of normal conditions.
Hydrogen in Mars upper atmosphere comes from water vapor in the lower atmosphere.
A "lucky combination" of conditions in the lower atmosphere and in space meant the phenomenon was visible across swathes of the country, Met Office space weather adviser Amanda Townsend said.
Oceans are rising, Antarctica is losing its ice sheets, and the lower atmosphere is heating up.
A magnetically controlled stream of electrons, somehow dumped into the star's lower atmosphere, likely excites atoms and incites them to emit the auroral photons.
And we also had the sun's rays reflected off very high cirrus ice clouds high in the atmosphere and also off stratus clouds in the lower atmosphere.
Without a net charge, these atoms would pass through the ionosphere and into the lower atmosphere where they might somehow lose the hitchhiking electrons and regain a charge.

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