Lowland

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lowland

1. relatively low ground
2. a low generally flat region

Lowland

of or relating to the Lowlands of Scotland or the dialect of English spoken there
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Lowland

 

land lying not more than 200 m above sea level. The surface is usually level, although it may sometimes be hilly. Lowlands are formed chiefly by tectonic subsidence and the filling of basins with marine or continental deposits (chiefly river alluvium), which bed more or less horizontally. Some lowlands lie below sea level, for example, the Caspian Lowland.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Meanwhile, government datus may be far more effective bureaucrats, but they have little or no cultural legitimacy, and are often accused of acting like lowlanders, and selling out their culture and/or their land for self-enrichment or to achieve more ambitious political goals.
For the Omoro - who are relative newcomers to high altitude - the researchers also found differences between highlanders and lowlanders in DNA methylation, a chemical process that causes changes in gene activity, but doesn't necessarily alter the genetic code.
Highlanders did not want to pay for improvements which were of no immediate interest to them, while lowlanders felt that some of their problems originated in erosion or in the improvements originating on farms on higher ground, further up the watershed.
This is associated with the haematological profile of Tibetan highlanders which is similar to the one typical of lowlanders. Indeed, an increased haemoglobin concentration and haematocrit, while can be advantageous under hypoxia, results in an elevated blood viscosity, thereby compromising tissue oxygenation and ultimately survival at high altitude.
Studies have shown that sea-level natives, or lowlanders, exhibit no change in diffusing capacity after living four weeks at high altitude (12,000 feet).
Sasunnaich, English, English-speaking, formerly also applied to the lowlanders of Scotland as an Englishman or woman.
The traditional line of division between Highlanders and Lowlanders goes all the way back to Roman times and was drawn north of the River Tay.
of New Mexico) presents an organizational history of the Society in Scotland for the Propagation of Christian Knowledge, which was founded in 1709 for the purpose of converting the linguistic, religious, and political practices of Scottish Highlanders to those of the English-speaking, Presbyterian, and royalist Scottish Lowlanders. It would later establish itself in the Americas with a similar mission towards the Iroquois, Algonquin, and southeastern Native peoples.
Given the traditional stereotype of the goral as taciturn and suspicious when confronted by outsiders and lowlanders, Cooley has accomplished a remarkable piece of fieldwork.
This was based on the fact that the Lowlanders (south and east) treated Highlanders (west and north) as intellectually inferior.
"We are proud to be Lowlanders, we don't want to be Highlanders," said Malcolm Nichol, former secretary of the Berwick branch of the King's Own Scottish Borderers.