lucid


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lucid

Psychiatry of or relating to a period of normality between periods of insane or irresponsible behaviour

LUCID

(1)
Early query language, ca. 1965, System Development Corp, Santa Monica, CA. [Sammet 1969, p.701].

LUCID

(2)
A family of dataflow languages descended from ISWIM, lazy but first-order.

Ashcroft & Wadge <wwadge@csr.uvic.ca>, 1981.

They use a dynamic demand driven model. Statements are regarded as equations defining a network of processors and communication lines, through which the data flows. Every data object is thought of as an infinite stream of simple values, every function as a filter. Lucid has no data constructors such as arrays or records. Iteration is simulated with 'is current' and 'fby' (concatenation of sequences). Higher-order functions are implemented using pure dataflow and no closures or heaps.

["Lucid: The Dataflow Language" by Bill Wadge <wwadge@csr.UVic.CA> and Ed Ashcroft, c. 1985]. ["Lucid, the Dataflow Programming Language", W. Wadge, Academic Press 1985].
References in classic literature ?
As for Spain, for instance, if you know how to throw in Don Carlos and the Infanta, and Don Pedro and Seville and Granada, from time to time in the right proportions -- they may have changed the names a little since I saw the papers -- and serve up a bull-fight when other entertainments fail, it will be true to the letter, and give us as good an idea of the exact state or ruin of things in Spain as the most succinct and lucid reports under this head in the newspapers: and as for England, almost the last significant scrap of news from that quarter was the revolution of 1649; and if you have learned the history of her crops for an average year, you never need attend to that thing again, unless your speculations are of a merely pecuniary character.
She came down the path carrying her despair with lucid calmness.
I sought out and put into his hands two of Milicent's letters: one dated from London, and written during one of his wildest seasons of reckless dissipation; the other in the country, during a lucid interval.
First of all, of course, our authority for the issue and event of the battle is in Olivier's own dispatches, which are lucid enough.
Never, I'll swear, was he so lucid and so strong as when poor Murray lay a cold lump at his feet.
He seemed to recover himself, for a lucid gleam came into his eyes, and he relaxed his hold with a short laugh that was more like a growl.
The idea that he should never see her again depressed him in his lucid hours.
You owe me something more lucid in the way of explanations.
I am trying to be as lucid as I can in presenting this obscure matter to you without details.
Razumov seemed beside himself; but his mind was lucid.
Very discreet of Mr Dennis,' observed Sir John with a slight yawn, though still with the utmost affability, 'but--except for your admirable and lucid manner of telling it, which is perfect--not very interesting to me.
Mr Plornish picked a bit of lime out of his whisker, put it between his lips, turned it with his tongue like a sugar-plum, considered, found himself unequal to the task of lucid explanation, and appealing to his wife, said, 'Sally, you may as well mention how it was, old woman.