lumbar puncture

(redirected from lumbar punctures)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

lumbar puncture:

see spinal puncturespinal puncture,
surgical penetration of the spinal canal by a hollow needle introduced between two of the lumbar vertebrae. The arrangement permits injection of antibiotics or anesthetics (see anesthesia) as well as dyes to facilitate X-ray studies.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

lumbar puncture

Med insertion of a hollow needle into the lower region of the spinal cord to withdraw cerebrospinal fluid, introduce drugs, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
This system was tested in a patient with confirmed diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus-associated cryptococcal meningitis (HIV-CM) and severe intracranial hypertension, before and after therapeutic lumbar puncture.
Lumbar puncture demonstrated a leukocyte count of 1,010 cells/pL (74% neutrophils, 12% lymphocytes, 14% monocytes), glucose 17 mg/dL, protein 258 g/L, and an opening pressure of >55 cm [H.
But personally, in that second month of fife, I would use these data to decide who actually needs a lumbar puncture and hospitalization," he said.
An attempt for lumbar puncture was defined as separate skin puncture with spinal needle for lumbar puncture.
There are physicians who feel that all HIV-infected patients should undergo lumbar puncture.
Firstly, anaesthetic trainees perform lumbar punctures in a dedicated anaesthetic room whilst the presence of 'procedure/treatment rooms' is not universal on medical wards.
Of the 14 patients with reactive RPR tests, 4 had lumbar punctures performed in the EC, of which 1 was abnormal.
But next month, Niamh returns to Alder Hey Children's Hospital in Liverpool for another lumbar puncture.
Predicting difficult and traumatic lumbar punctures.
Blood can be collected at any clinic or in-home visit and most patients will agree to the process, whereas not all facilities can conduct lumbar punctures to obtain cerebrospinal fluid.
Since traumatic lumbar punctures are fairly common with an estimated incidence of about 10% to 20%, (2) the clinical laboratory routinely needs to try to differentiate a subarachnoid hemorrhage from a traumatic tap.
Hypnosis was consistently found to be more effective than control conditions in alleviating discomfort associated with bone marrow aspirations, lumbar punctures, voiding cystourethograms, the Nuss procedure, and post-surgical pain.