luminous blue variables

luminous blue variables

(LBVs) A class of very massive luminous blue stars known for sporadic mass ejections (eruptions); subclasses include P Cygni stars and Hubble–Sandage variables. They are generally found near the upper luminosity limit in the observed Hertzsprung–Russell diagram, and most are thought to have evolved from stars with initial masses exceeding 40 solar masses. The mass ejections are most likely due to instabilities in their stellar envelopes caused by radiation pressure. LBVs show different types of variations occurring on a wide range of timescales. The largest variations are associated with sudden brightenings by more than 3 magnitudes lasting for several hundred to several thousand years. The smallest variations (< 0.5 mag) last from several months to several years. Examples of LBVs are Eta Carinae, AG Carinae, P Cygni, and S Doradus.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
Luminous Blue Variables are evolved massive stars that undergo an evolutionary phase associated with a very strong mass loss.
Arkharov, "On the population of galactic Luminous Blue Variables," Astronomy and Astrophysics, vol.
This process might be common to all Type IIn supernovae, which are thought to be the deaths of luminous blue variables, massive stars known for their eruptive events.
Such objects are known as luminous blue variables (LBVs), stars that have nearly exhausted their hydrogen fuel, and, for reasons, which are poorly understood, undergo brief recurrent episodes of explosive mass loss.
During this stage, heavy stars such as Eta Carinae are known as luminous blue variables. This phase lasts for less than 100,000 years--a mere blink in astronomical time.
In other galaxies, such "luminous blue variables" have exploded abruptly--such as SN 2006jc, which flared in 2004 and then blasted apart two years later.
The progenitor was so bright that it probably belonged to a class of stars called Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs), "because no other type of star is as intrinsically brilliant," said Gal-Yam.
Luminous blue variables (LBVs) such as P Cygni shed enormous amounts of material during their eruptions.
Extremely hot, massive stars known as luminous blue variables (LBVs) occasionally throw o.
Eta Carinae is one of only a few luminous blue variables (LBVs) in the Milky Way.
Luminous blue variables such as P Cygni are believed to represent a short-lived (about 100,000-year) phase in the life of every massive star.
An astronomer at the University of Minnesota, KRIS DAVIDSON studies the most massive stars, particularly luminous blue variables such as Eta Carinae.