lunar crater


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lunar crater

[′lü·nər ′krād·ər]
(astronomy)
A crater on the moon's surface.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The size distribution of lunar craters. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 1966, v.
The Lunar Crater Remote Observation and Sensing Satellite mission involved deliberately crashing a spent rocket into a crater near the Moon's south pole.
Both of these measurements together "made us really confident" that there's water in the lunar crater, Colaprete told Science News.
Scientist Anthony Colaprete said: "The concentration and distribution of water and other substances requires further analysis, but it is now safe to say the lunar crater holds water."
The pounds 49m expedition involved crashing two US spacecraft into a lunar crater near the Moon's south pole, and was designed to throw up spray from any ice that was there.
of Redondo Beach, Calif., says testing on NASA's Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite, or LACROSS, is several months ahead of schedule.
The Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) will carry the Ocean Optics equipment, affectionately dubbed "ALICE," to help analyze the makeup of the lunar craters with the goal of locating water below the moon's surface.
On April 23, 1994, about 100 amateur astronomers claimed to have seen a darkening of the moon lasting 40 minutes near the edge of the bright lunar crater Aristarchus.
Between them they recognised, as others had done before, that there were significant differences between the craters of the Moon and terrestrial calderas, especially in scale; and they set out to explain those differences and advance a coherent theory of lunar crater formation by volcanic means.
"They were limited to a mile or so between individual data points, whereas our measurements are spaced about 57 meters (about 187 feet) apart in five adjacent tracks separated by about 15 meters (almost 50 feet).""Recent papers have clarified some aspects of lunar processes based solely on the more precise topography provided by the new LOLA maps," adds Neumann, "such as lunar crater density and resurfacing by impacts, or the formation of multi-ring basins.""The LOLA data also allow us to define the current and historical illumination environment on the moon," said Neumann.
Pictures of the crash were supposed to be beamed by the second probe Lcross - short for Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite.
Two NASA craft, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, set for launch later this year, and the Lunar Crater Observatory and Sensing Satellite, scheduled for 2009, will look for that frozen water.