lunar satellite

lunar satellite

[′lü·nər ′sad·əl‚īt]
(aerospace engineering)
A satellite making one or more revolutions about the moon.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
A full moon is set to appear on the evening of September 14, as our lunar satellite will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun, meaning its face will be fully illuminated.
During a lunar eclipse, Earth passes between the moon and the sun, and the planet casts its shadow over its lunar satellite. It's nothing like the spectacle of a total solar eclipse, but the red tinge the moon takes on is striking.
The state-run Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) has selected SpaceX's Falcon 9 transporter rocket to launch its experimental lunar satellite by 2020, the researcher said Tuesday.
Another option, says UCLA astrophysicist Steven Furlanetto, would be a proposed project called the Dark Ages Radio Explorer, a lunar satellite that would use the moon as a shield against interference from technologies like television and radio.
The project is based on a research conducted by CAST and will make use of the technologies developed for China's first lunar satellite launched in 2007, he added.
In the next couple of months, as the lunar satellite starts its mission to map the moon for future landing sites for astronauts, it will get much better photos, Mr Robinson said.
SLN specialises in telemetric, tracking and communications technology and is involved in the Indian lunar satellite project Chandrayaan and worked on the control system for India's moon mission.
This booklet included a visualization, prepared by North American Aviation, of an "unmanned lunar satellite controlled from Earth." Mallan explained its purpose: it would "map the surface of the Moon in detail before men are sent on a lunar mission" because that enterprise "would be dangerous if they didn't know where to land geographically."
1966: The first US lunar satellite, Orbiter I, was launched.
Here's everything you need to know about NASA's moon plans, including when and why the space agency plans to return to our lunar satellite.
According to a report in New Scientist, the new gravity map was collected by the Japanese lunar satellite Kaguya, which released two small probes into orbit around the Moon in 2007.