lunatic


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lunatic

1. an archaic word for insane
2. a person who is insane
References in classic literature ?
I didn't know how to go about satisfying it, because I knew that the testimony of men wouldn't serve -- my reason would say they were lunatics, and throw out their evidence.
I made up my mind to two things: if it was still the nineteenth century and I was among lunatics and couldn't get away, I would presently boss that asylum or know the reason why; and if, on the other hand, it was really the sixth century, all right, I didn't want any softer thing: I would boss the whole country inside of three months; for I judged I would have the start of the best-educated man in the kingdom by a matter of thirteen hundred years and upward.
His behaviour here for the first time seemed to denote the hopeless lunatic.
Rochester flung me behind him: the lunatic sprang and grappled his throat viciously, and laid her teeth to his cheek: they struggled.
John Seward, the lunatic asylum man, with the strong jaw and the good forehead.
She sent a telegram to the jockey at the time saying how sad she was that he couldn't finish the race due to "the abominable conduct of a brutal lunatic woman".
At this the Abbe leaves his room bare and leaves the Marquis with no other option than to whisper his stories from lunatic to lunatic until Madeleine can pen them down.
As a diagnosed lunatic and nutcase and somebody who has been fighting "mental health stigma" for the last ten years, the "deranged mentalities" that Mr Hayes-Carter describes are exactly as he alludes to, "home grown".
She further chided, 'Oh yeah, because he married an f--g lunatic, that's why.
Moreover, a lunatic person killed one of his brother and critically injured anther after stabbing with an axe in the area of Lower Kurram Agency here on Monday.
You took your girlfriend's car and drove like a lunatic in a residential area.
Drawing on his research in the archives of the Central Mental Hospital (previously Central Criminal Lunatic Asylum), Dundrum, Dublin, Kelly describes mental health care in 19th-century Ireland and the slow change to more science-based and humane treatments.