lupus vulgaris


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lupus vulgaris

[′lü·pəs vəl′gar·əs]
(medicine)
True tuberculosis of the skin; a slow-developing, scarring, and deforming disease, often asymptomatic, frequently involving the face, and occurring in a wide variety of appearances.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Granulomatous ulcers of the nose and oropharynx: Lupus vulgaris revisited.
Paucibacillary forms (bacilli being sparse) include TB verrucosa cutis, tuberculoid, and lupus vulgaris [17,18].
Lupus vulgaris (LV) is a rare, chronic, progressive form of tuberculosis caused by continuous spread from an underlying focus of infection or by hematogenous or lymphatic spread [1, 2].
In the present study, 21 (67.7%) cases were of lupus vulgaris, 8 (25.8%) cases were of scrofuloderma (SFD) and 2 (6.4%) were of tuberculosis verrocusa cutis (TBVC) (Figure 3).
The clinical and pathologic lesions are varying from scrofuloderma to lupus vulgaris (LV) in CT,6 but the most common form of CT is LV.5 The most significant problem for the diagnosis of CT is the low positive cultures results.5 Here, we describe a young girl with LV involving the left face and arm, and she may be the youngest case with the diagnosis of CT in the literature.
Lupus vulgaris in a pediatric patient: A clinical-histopathological diagnosis.
We report a 10-year-old boy with lupus vulgaris involving the left cheek with emphasis on clinicohistopathological diagnosis.
Lupus vulgaris, the second most common tuberculosis skin manifestation in children, is a reinfection of the skin in people who have a high degree of sensitization.
Tuberculosis verrucosa cutis (43%) was the commonest type of skin TB than lupus vulgaris (30%), erythema induratum of Bazin (13.3%) and others cutaneous types (13.3%).
Only 21 had lupus vulgaris (LV), 8 patients had scrofuloderma and 2 had tuberculosis verrucosa cutis.
We report a case of tuberculosis verrucosa cutis (TBVC) presenting as a warty lesion on the forehead and of lupus vulgaris (LV) in the axilla which is a rare presentation.