Lycaenidae

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Lycaenidae

[lī′sēn·ə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
A family of heteroneuran lepidopteran insects in the superfamily Papilionoidea including blue, gossamer, hairstreak, copper, and metalmark butterflies.

Lycaenidae

 

a family of diurnal butterflies. Their wing-spread is 2 to 4 cm. In the male the wings are light blue, dark blue, green, or orange-red, sometimes with considerable glitter; the females’ wings are brown. Occasionally the wings are the same in both sexes. Underneath, the wings are grayish with rows of small eyelike spots. There are more than 2,500 species, of which up to 500 are found in the moderate latitudes of the northern hemisphere. Some 60 species are known in the European part of the USSR. The caterpillars feed on broad-leaved trees (Thecla), grassy Polygonaceae (Chrysophanus), or legumes (various Lycaenidae). In some species the caterpillars are carnivores, eating aphids and scale insects. Lycaenidae do not cause great damage to crops.

References in periodicals archive ?
Host specificity revisited: new data on Myrraica host ants of the lycaenid butterfly Maculinea rebeli.
Tentacles and Newcomer gland, the myrmecophilous structures characteristic of the lycaenid larvae could be seen in the caterpillars.
Although both Africa (Ghana) and South America (Colombia) support a rich lycaenid fauna, the distribution of many lycaenid species are limited by their specialised habitat preferences (Legg 1978; Fiedler 1996).
This lycaenid may be numerous during early October but adult abundance may continue throughout this month until December.
Lycaenid butterflies and plants: is myrmecophily associated with particular hostplant preferences?
Another small Lycaenid butterfly, the Western Pygmy Blue Brephidium exilis, a native of arid south-western North America, has established itself in the Arabian Gulf region, from Northern Oman to Kuwait, apparently over the past 25 years (see, e.
Finally we give the remark, that the trait of ventrally red coloured abdomen so typical for some Neotropical eumaeine lycaenid genera (for example Atlides, Eumaeus, Thecloxurina), which most probably advertises toxicity, lacks in Theorema (and also in Eumaeus childrenae).
Jammed amongst material of "Thecla barajo" and its relatives in the Main Butterfly collection of the Natural History Museum, London (cabinet series 28A, drawer number 68) since almost a century, a large, curious female lycaenid butterfly specimen was curated as an undescribed species by Frederick Goodson (BALINT, 2005a).
Coevolution: Patterns of legume predation by a lycaenid butterfly.