lycopene


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Related to lycopene: lutein

lycopene

[′lī·kə‚pēn]
(biochemistry)
C40H50 A red, crystalline hydrocarbon that is the coloring matter of certain fruits, as tomatoes; it is isomeric with carotene.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike other fruits and vegetables where nutritional content, such as vitamin C, is diminished when the produce is cooked, the processing of tomatoes increases the concentration of bioavailable lycopene.
It appears that lycopene fights cancer by reducing the spread of cancerous cells.
Lycopene Market research report Includes 150 pages profiling 8 companies and supported with 98 tables available at http://www.
Lycopene is the major coloring pigment in tomato although many other carotenoids substances are also responsible for deep red coloration.
The first group (n = 8) was treated for 8 weeks with saline vehicle after an isograft (1 ml/day, isograft group); the second group (n = 8) was treated for 8 weeks with saline vehicle after an allograft (allograft group); the third group (n = 8) was treated for 8 weeks with lycopene (30 mg/kg/d, lycopene group) after an allograft.
The comparatively better hearing ear was evaluated in the study; 100 patients in study group were given commercially available capsule supplement contains lycopene and multivitamins (Lycored, lyco DM, licosule plus) once a day after meals for 12 months.
Editor's Note: Lycopene is an antioxidant that is found in tomatoes, watermelon, and other red fruits, in addition to being available as an over-the-counter supplement.
Until this approval of lycopene at higher allowable levels, carmine was the choice of colorant to be used in some processed meat products as noted in the USDA FSIS Directive 7120.
Scientists in Cambridge decided to investigate how lycopene lowered the risk of heart disease and it turns out a daily dose of ketchup could significantly improve the state of blood vessels in patients with heart disease.
The researchers said amount of micronutrients including lycopene in the women's diets was estimated from the information they provided on questionnaires when they enrolled in the study.
Whilst there is strong epidemiological evidence to support the role of lycopene in reducing cardiovascular risk, the mechanism by which it does so is unclear.
Just remember that it's too early to know whether lycopene lowers the risk of lethal prostate cancer.