lymphadenopathy

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Related to lymphadenopathies: adenopathy, regional lymphadenopathy

lymphadenopathy

[‚lim‚fad·ən′äp·ə·thē]
(medicine)
Enlargement or disease of lymph nodes.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lymphadenopathies that are at the supraclavicular region, larger than 2 cm diameters, going on longer than 4 weeks and not responding to non-specific antibiotic treatment should be suspected in terms of malignancy.
1-4) of metastatic lymphadenopathies are well correlated with other reports (Cowell et al., 2003; Thangathurai et al., 2008; Raskin and Meyer, 2010; Thangapandiyan and Balachandran, 2014; Thangapandiyan et al., 2014).
Comparison of Fine needle aspiration cytology and histopathology in diagnosing cervical lymphadenopathies. Australas Med J 2011;4(2):97-9.
Information regarding squamous cell lung cancer presenting with necrotic mediastinal lymphadenopathies is sparse, but squamous cell carcinoma of the lung should be considered in patients with mediastinal lymph node aspirate showing liquid necrotic [8].
Lymphadenopathy is defined as an abnormality in size, number, and consistency of one or more than one lymph nodes.1 Lymphadenopathies involving a single or two neighbouring lymph nodes are termed local lymphadenopathies, when more than two lymph nodes are involved then this condition is called generalized lymphadenopathy which is categorized in two forms.
In our study, we found lymphadenopathies mostly in the neck region with a rate of 88%.
The features of these lymph nodes were reminiscent of the cases of allergic lymphadenopathies described by Gall and Rappaport[5] in a monograph published in 1958.
A total number of 378 cases of lymphadenopathies with clinical diagnosis were aspirated during a period of 4 years.
Our objective was to define all bacterial causes of lymphadenopathies for samples initially sent to our center for detection of CSD.
Although most reactive and infectious lymphadenopathies show nonspecific histologic findings, diagnostic morphologic features can be seen in a few reactive conditions, such as infectious mononucleosis, virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection.[1,2] We present clinical and pathologic findings in 2 patients with long-standing reactive lymphadenopathy due to Actinomyces infection.
[6] The role of fine needle aspiration cytology in the evaluation of lymphadenopathies is well known.
A second case was later reported in a hemodialysis patient with Sjogren syndrome who had mediastinal lymphadenopathies and secondary pancytopenia (28).