duct

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Related to lymphatic duct: lymphatic system, thoracic duct

duct

1. any bodily passage, esp one conveying secretions or excretions
2. a narrow tubular cavity in plants, often containing resin or some other substance
3. a channel or pipe carrying electric cable or wires

Duct

A nonmetallic or metallic tube for housing wires or cables, may be underground or embedded in concrete floor slabs; a duct usually fabricated of metal, used to transfer air from one location to another.

duct

[dəkt]
(anatomy)
An enclosed tubular channel for conducting a glandular secretion or other body fluid.
(communications)
An enclosed runway for cables.
(geophysics)
The space between two air layers, or between an air layer and the earth's surface, in which microwave beams are trapped in ducting. Also known as radio duct; tropospheric duct.
(mechanical engineering)
A fluid flow passage which may range from a few inches in diameter to many feet in rectangular cross section, usually constructed of galvanized steel, aluminum, or copper, through which air flows in a ventilation system or to a compressor, supercharger, or other equipment at speeds ranging to thousands of feet per minute.

duct

1. ,See air duct.
2. In electric systems, a metallic or nonmetallic tube, (usually circular, oval, rectangular, or octagonal) for housing wires or cables; may be underground or embedded in concrete floor slabs.

duct

A thin-wall tube installed in aircraft air-conditioning and heating systems to carry heated or cooled air for distribution to various aircraft locations.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is variable as sometimes the right lymphatic duct is absent, and these major trunks enter the venous system at different locations (3).
These channels, except for the lacteals which contain a milky fluid called chyle, contain a clear liquid known as lymph which drains to the lymph nodes and ultimately reaches the thoracic duct or the right lymphatic duct which direct the lymph into the venous system at the junction of the jugular and subclavian veins on either side (Leeds, 1997).
The right lymphatic duct drains the right side of the head, neck, and chest wall; it also drains the right lung and the lower half of the left lung, the heart, the dome of the liver, and the right diaphragm via the bronchomediastinal trunk.
Although its etiology is not fully understood, it is thought to be associated with prostaglandin synthesis stimulation in the endothelial cells, which is caused by sirolimus and results in increased permeability and lymphatic leakage in vascular segments as well as increased interstitial pressure and compression of the lymphatic ducts or impaired lymph drainage mechanism (4).