lymphoid cell


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial.

lymphoid cell

[′lim‚fȯid ‚sel]
(histology)
A mononucleocyte that resembles a leukocyte.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lymphoid cells obtained from normal (control) fish grew both in the presence and in the absence of PPD.
2] vge/mL and that 30% to 40% of them also carried HCV RNA in circulating lymphoid cells at levels between 10 and 1[0.
Table 1 indicates, however, that even after 2 weeks of daily exposure to the polysaccharide, non-NK lymphoid cells in the bone marrow were still decreased significantly (p < 0.
2 A: Dermis showing sheets of atypical lymphoid cells of intermediate to large size with brisk mitotic activity (hematoxylin & eosin staining [H&E] x400); B: Sheets of atypical lymphoid cells replacing testicular parenchyma showing frequent mitoses (H&E x400), inset--residual entrapped seminiferous tubules in the tumour (H&E x200); C: Tumour cells showing positivity for leukocyte common antigen (x400); D: Tumour cells showing positivity for CD20 (x400).
Neoplastic lymphoid cells were diffusely immunohistochemically positive for CD30 and focally positive for CD3 (a T-cell marker) and epithelial membrane antigen.
Such diseases involve activation of both Th2 lymphocytes and type 2 innate lymphoid cells and are often associated with elevation in the numbers of eosinophils in both blood and target tissues.
Innate lymphoid cells were recently described by the scientific community and represent the first line of immunological defence on our body surfaces, which are constantly exposed to bacteria, such as the intestine or skin.
A few small clusters of large, activated CD30positive lymphoid cells were also present.
It typically manifests as a tumour of the lymphoid cells.
Although LPS-induced proliferation of lymphoid cells is thought to be primarily restricted to B cells, a number of reports suggest potential effects on T cells.