lymphokine


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lymphokine

[′lim·fə‚kīn]
(immunology)
A cytokine released from T lymphocytes after contact with an antigen.
References in periodicals archive ?
IL-6 is a lymphokine that works with IL-2 to stimulate the growth and maturation of T lymphocytes.
Goupille et al., "Susceptibility of rat colon carcinoma cells to lymphokine activated killer-mediated cytotoxicity is decreased by [alpha]1, 2-fucosylation," International Journal of Cancer, vol.
Macrophage are responsive to a number of lymphokines that induce their growth differentiation and activation; since lymphokines are released by primed lymphocytes, produced chiefly by T-lymphocytes, on contact with an antigen [21], and the demonstration of a lymphookine mediated reaction in this study strongly supported the existence of T like lymphocytes in Tilapias and that the fish is capable of delayed hypersensitivity reactions.
The scientific review analyzed outcomes from in vivo studies and reported that AHCC activates important immune white blood cells, including macrophages, natural killer cells and lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cells following foreign challenges such as influenza virus, avian influenza (bird flu), MRSA, Klebsiella pnuemoniae and Candida albicans.
Table 2-3 Some Types of Cytokines and Their Functions Type Source Function Interleukin-1 Monokine produced by Activates B and activated macrophages T lymphocytes; mediates inflammation Interleukin-2 Lymphokine produced by Growth factor for B and helper T cells T lymphocytes; enhances cytotoxic effects of nonkiller (NK) cells Interferon Lymphokine produced by Activates macrophages; helper and suppressor promotes B- and T-cell T cells differentiation; activates neutrophils and NK cells Tumor necrosis Monokine produced by Mediator of inflammation factor activated macrophages Table 2-4 Phases of Acquired Immunity Phase Action Recognition Exposure to a specific antigen resulting in selective activation and expansion of those lymphocytes with antigenic receptors specific for that antigen.
One form of treatment involves removing lymphocytes from the blood and using a substance called IL-2 (a form of interleukin) to 'activate' the cells before returning them to the blood: Lymphokine Activated Killer (LAK) Therapy.
T-cells and their lymphokine products have intrigued gerontologists ever since it was learned that T-cells--or more precisely the functioning population of T-cells--declines with age.
[2006] who concluded that loss-of-function mutations in cathepsin C do not affect lymphokine activated killer cell function.