machine safety


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machine safety

Safeguards that are applied to both machinery and the operators who work with them. Examples are interlocks that stop a motor if a person gets too close, guards that cover moving gears and blades and goggles and protective clothing. See safety.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hundreds of workers are injured every year in manufacturing facilities because employers fail to follow machine safety procedures, said Kim Nelson, OSHA Area Office Director in Toledo.
New analysis from Frost & Sullivan, “Strategic Analysis of the European Machine Safety Market” (http://www.industrialautomation.frost.com), finds that the market earned revenues of $422.0 million in 2010 and estimates this to reach $565.6 million in 2017.
The Rockwell Automation machine safety portfolio now includes the new Allen-Bradley GuardLogix 5580 controller, Compact GuardLogix 5380 controller, and Compact 5000 safety I/O.
Its innovative design makes this key component for machine safety simpler to install, easier to maintain and safer to operate.
Machine safety is vital where combustible gases are used, and the T550 incorporates an oxygen leak detector and an automatic shutdown mechanism, and tray materials which can be sealed include foam, semi rigid polyesters and rigid CPFT, they tell us.
Technology is changing the face of machine safety with increased sophistication and greater use of robotics, and subsequently there is growing demand for smart manufacturing solutions that bring together human and artificial intelligence.
The inspection body is not prohibited from providing comprehensive support throughout the machine safety lifecycle, so it can help the manufacturer identify non-conformity, propose solutions, engineer these solutions, validate them, certify and CE mark the machine
Manufacturing engineers typically use many different tools when developing and specifying machine safety systems, and it is still largely a manual process.
The five-day course is currently being evaluated by Teesside University with the aim of gaining accreditation alongside the current Laidler University Certificate in European Machine Safety Requirements.
Its Design in Safety risk-assessment process requires that equipment suppliers validate that machine safety systems will function as designed before installation.
Changes will soon be made to some of the most fundamental and familiar standards relating to machine safety, says leading safety and compliance consultant, Laidler Associates.