macroeconomics

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macroeconomics

the branch of economics concerned with aggregates, such as national income, consumption, and investment
www.elsevier.com/homepage/sae/econworld/econbase/jmacro/frame.htm
www.stern.nyu.edu/globalmacro
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Macroeconomist Robert Barro of Harvard University put forth the argument in the 1970s that government spending multipliers will be close to zero precisely because when government rims a deficit, taxpayers rationally will add the value of that deficit to their expected future tax liabilities.
On August 15, 2012, Forest Economic Advisors' macroeconomist, Brendan Lowney, will discuss several of the key risks to the relatively optimistic housing outlook that has become the consensus view.
Before joining GM, Chu was a macroeconomist at the Central and Eastern European division of the World Bank in Washington.
Georgi Angelov, macroeconomist with local think-tank Open Society Institute, called for completely abandoning NHIF's monopoly so that it can compete on a 100% even playing field with private funds.
Another macroeconomist who declined to be named said that the fiscal reserve has been accumulated by surpluses aimed at cooling off the once-sizzling economy and now that the boom has subsided, the money should be ploughed back into the private sector.
Shakeb Syed, macroeconomist at Handelsbanken Capital Markets, forecast that the central bank will give several positive signals but will not raise the repo rate yet due to the strengthening of the Norwegian crown.
He was principally a macroeconomist with interests in finance and money and banking, and his research covered subjects from the copper industry to the Canadian economy.
The event attracted a number of macroeconomist luminaries, including University of Chicago professor Robert E.
Ignatiev is "a very serious, very detailed and focused macroeconomist", said Al Breach, a Moscow-based economist with Goldman Sachs, who pointed out that Ignatiev has also dealt with international financial institutions such as the IMF).
To suppose that contemporary non-interventionist writers - new classical or otherwise - derive inspiration from or owe anything directly to the writings of any "macroeconomist" born later than Adam Smith is arguable and, in my view, preposterous.