macroscopic state

macroscopic state

[¦mak·rə¦skäp·ik ′stāt]
(statistical mechanics)
Any state of a system as described by actual or hypothetical observations of its macroscopic statistical properties. Also known as macrostate.
References in periodicals archive ?
The density and the average space mean speed of traffic, which are two spatial parameters difficult to measure from field, were considered as the macroscopic state variables in this study.
The macroscopic state of the swarm is presented in Figure 10 for t = 140 h.
In other words, a macroscopic state exhibiting no quantum mechanical interference appears to arise from some sort of co-operation among the infinity of subsystems.
Quantum mechanics (without the infinity assumption) predicts that superpositions of macroscopic states will be observed in such systems.
These are tunable quantum systems with properties that emerge from the strong interaction between coherent units, with macroscopic states that are determined by collective quantum many-body physics.
The meaning of a macroscopic object (e.g., as a certain amount of a gas, a crystal, a pointer on a volt meter, a cat, human beings) is crucial since it makes it clear that although also governed by quantum mechanics, nonetheless, the combination of the enormous number of quantum states in the macroscopic object eliminates the quantum interference between macroscopic states, say, two human beings.
Recently, this situation has improved, as scientists find that while it may be difficult to prove the quantumness of macroscopic states, it is not impossible.
Chaotic macroscopic states of highly kinematic and interactive complex systems conform to the kinematic laws, however they are too complex to predict.
These are tuneable quantum systems with properties that emerge from the strong interaction between coherent units, with macroscopic states that are determined by collective quantum many-body physics.