maculate

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maculate

[′mak·yə·lət]
(botany)
Marked with speckles or spots.
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The prophetic sponsors of the sacred word, at the very time of its canonization, were aware of maculations in the text.
At least one illustrious rabbinic commentator of the Middle Ages went as far as to claim that it does not matter whether the Torah was revealed through Moses or through Ezra;(2) but even if we speculated that the canonical Torah was revealed anew, word for word, to Ezra, we could not thereby account for persisting maculations in the text.
The literary evidence of the Bible itself, and of the earliest extrascriptural traditions, demonstrates that the agents of canonization were aware of maculations in their holy text.
I prefer to suggest that the maculations of the text, great and small, are the consequence of a more terrible and protracted period of corruption - ages of idolatry and syncretism in the period of Israelite settlement in the Land and in the period of the First Temple.
In fact, by relying on the entirely traditional concept of Ezra as the prophet-scribe of the return from exile, we have been able to account for the maculations of the canonical Pentateuch in a way not incompatible with faith.
Despite the accumulated maculations of the written word, Ezra and his fellow leaders were able to institute uniform and coherent practice among the returnees from exile.
color and total density of maculation, than eggs of all other grassland passerines ([[chi square].
Cowbird eggs were indistinguishable from the ground and maculation colors, and total density of maculation as measured for the average grassland passerine eggs from this community in southern Saskatchewan (Table 1).
Cowbird eggs so closely approximated the color and maculation density of grassland passerine eggs that 88% (1 of every 1.
Alternatively, divergences in maculation distribution might reflect the parameters used by grassland passerines to discriminate cowbird eggs.
Our results show that cowbird eggs were most readily distinguished from eggs of Western Meadowlarks on the basis of color and maculation density (Tables 2, 3).
Therefore, the same forces promoting the evolution of color and maculation density in grassland passerine eggs may have selected the same pattern in cowbird eggs (Underwood and Sealy 2002, Kilner 2006).