maculopapule


Also found in: Medical.

maculopapule

[¦mak·yə·lō′pap·yül]
(medicine)
A small, circumscribed, discolored elevation of the skin; a macule and papule combined.
References in periodicals archive ?
(1,2) It is characterized by a central maculopapule with a peripheral ring of scales, specifically notable on the palms and soles.
The former caused different kinds of eruptions such as maculopapule, excoriation, blisters, edema, ulcer, and the latter caused jaundice, hepatosplenomegaly or abnormal hepatic function.
Our patient had presented with red maculopapules on his face, double ears, and neck, which were itchy and blanch on pressure and were ulcerated and scabby; dermatologist considered them as allergic dermatitis and prescribed mizolastine, loratadine, and ketotifen; and the maculopapules almost disappeared after the treatment.
Specific lesions are those that histologically display noncaseating granulomas, which manifest clinically as maculopapules, plaques, lupus pernio, scar-sarcoidosis, and subcutaneous sarcoidosis.
HCL is known to be associated with systemic immunologic disorders including scleroderma, polymyositis, polyarteritis nodosa, erythematous maculopapules, and pyoderma gangrenosum.
Urticaria pigmentosa is the most common pattern of cutaneous mastocytosis in both children and adults.2 It develops in the first year of life in 84% of 67 children.3 The most common age of onset for adult urticaria pigmentosa is 20-40 years.4 Numerous reddish-brown or pale, monomorphic maculopapules, plaques or nodules appear in a symmetrical distribution in various locations on the body (except the face, head, palms, and soles) with the highest concentration usually being on the trunk and thighs.
A patient with UP may present with brown or reddish maculopapules, papules, nodules, pruritus, and flushing of the face.
The BRAF inhibitors are associated with a nonspecific rash consisting of maculopapules and features similar to those of keratosis pilaris, giving the skin a sandpaperlike appearance.
Nonpruritic rashes developed in all patients and involved predominantly the trunk and extremities, represented by maculopapules on 8 patients, papulovesicles on 5 patients, and petechiae on 2 patients (Figure 2, panels B, C).