maggot therapy


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maggot therapy

[′mag·ət ‚ther·ə·pē]
(medicine)
Implantation of sterile cultivated maggots of the bluebottle fly into wounds in the treatment of chronic soft tissue infections and chronic osteomyelitis.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Maggot therapy: an alternative for wound infection.
The cost of maggot therapy largely is unknown by many physicians.
But ever since maggot therapy became a common practice [1], careful observers also noted other effects on the wounds: microbial killing (disinfection) and hastened wound healing (growth stimulation).
With the advent of antibiotic-resistant organisms and increasing drug sensitivities, there was a renewed interest in maggot therapy in the 1980s [40].
American Civil War was the time when Jones and Zacharias performed maggot therapy clinically.
According to Wikipedia, as of 2008, maggot therapy was being used in around 1,000 medical centres in Europe and over 800 medical centres in the United States.Maggots are also used in forensics to date corpses.
Some unsuccessful surgical and antibiotic treatments of infections such as temporal mastoiditis and perineal gangrene were treated using maggot therapy. Wounds resulting from cuts, wounds or even trauma resulting from diseases like diabetes, bed sores, gangrene, and burns are the problems of human societies (1).
One of the options offered is maggot therapy, in which sterile maggots are applied in a pack, in order to clean wounds and help recovery.
We used two bovines, one horse and one canine treated with maggot therapy in the veterinary clinic of the University of La Salle, Bogota-Colombia.
aeruginosa could be treated with an agent that interrupts bacterial signalling to ensure the success of maggot therapy and thereby wound healing."