magic lantern

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magic lantern:

see stereopticonstereopticon
, optical projection instrument making multiple use of the magic lantern. The magic lantern uses lenses to throw on a screen a magnified image from a transparent slide or from an opaque object such as a photograph or the page of a book.
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magic lantern

an early type of slide projector
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the exact origin of the magic lantern is uncertain, what is clear is that the projection of hand painted glass images on walls was already a couple centuries old when the magic lantern became popular in the mid-nineteenth century.
A digital display of magic lantern slides and other images from the culture collections photographs are on show to the public in the university's refurbished former library building.
By the mid- 1890s these "old picture books" had been set aside in favor of the magic lantern, which had made its appearance on the mission field.
He cites Gies's notion that Don Juan Tenorio represcnts a hybrid gente between romantic theater and the comedia de magia but notes that the long tradition of magic lantern shows featuring Tirso's El burlador de Sevilla y el convidado de piedra during the early nineteenth century may have significantly influenced not only Zorrilla but also the comedia de magia itself.
While modern slide projectors use an electric bulb, magic lanterns were first powered by wax candles, then advanced to paraffin lamps.
Kingsbury Water Park, near Atherstone, will offer sessions in mask-making and magic lanterns.
Magic Lanterns were the forerunner of modern slide projectors, and although it is difficult to say who actually invented them, their roots can be traced back to the camera obscuras and shadow shows of the Middle Ages.
CHILDREN in Northumberland will have the chance to see a collection of Victorian magic lanterns at the West Cawledge Antiques shop, off the A1 near Alnwick, tomorrow from 3pm to 5pm.
Organized by the Baltimore Museum of Art's Darsie Alexander, the show may still raise eyebrows for its unapologetic positing of slide projection as a medium with its own historical set of technological supports (arising from modes of projection beginning with magic lanterns in the seventeenth century) and procedural conventions (the techniques of successive display emerging from both nineteenth-century chronophotography and modern film).
The show, Magic Lanterns and the Moving Image, has been jointly organised by Pete James, head of photography at Birmingham Central Library, and magic lantern enthusiast and historian Mike Simkin.