magmatic differentiation

magmatic differentiation

[mag′mad·ik ‚dif·ə‚ren·chē′ā·shən]
(petrology)
The process by which the different types of igneous rocks are derived from a single parent magma.
The process by which ores are formed by solidification from magma. Also known as magmatic segregation.
References in periodicals archive ?
All these suggestions are compliant with previous conclusions from the X-ray luminescence of feldspar on common source of the Novosibirsk-Ob Area granitoids formation (Boroznovskaya et al., 2012), which allows us to consider the KTFB granitoid magmatism as the result of natural magmatic differentiation of the parental magma, providing a viable possibility to implement the quartz emission spectra in solving the problems of typification of granitoid massifs and other geological formations.
This evolution reflects the progressive increase in trace element contents (200-1,200 ppm Sn, 50-150 ppm Nb, 30-300 ppm Ta, 20-70 ppm W, 200-600 ppm Cs, 25-500 ppm Be, and 700-2,800 ppm Li) in whole-rock geochemistry that has been interpreted as a magmatic differentiation trend upward [12, 13].
Among their topics are experimental results on fractionation of the highly siderophile elements at variable pressures and temperatures during planetary and magmatic differentiation, nucleosynthetic isotope variations of siderophile and chalcophile elements in the solar system, the distribution and processing of highly siderophile elements in cratonic mantle lithosphere, chalcophile and siderophile elements in mantle rocks: trace elements controlled by trace minerals, petrogenesis of the platinum-group minerals, and highly siderophile and strongly chalcophile elements in magmatic ore deposits.
This was usually in close association with mafic and high magnesium rocks, suggesting magmatic differentiation of the ultramafic bodies.
and Barsczus, H.G., 2000, Contrasting behavior of noble-metal elements during magmatic differentiation in basalts from the Cook Islands, Polynesia: Geology, v.
Isotopic composition of lithium is potentially a powerful tracer of geochemical processes such as high-temperature magmatic differentiation, alteration of oceanic crust or fluidrock interactions.
Silicate chemistry - A structural approach is taken to the chemical and physical characteristics of silicates and their role in shaping the environment through geologic processes: magmatic differentiation, weathering, sedimentation.
Thus, the fluid formed by magmatic differentiation of partial melting of the crust is enriched in C[O.sub.2] and F.
Unravel how arcs are built on geological timescales, What the role and the rates of magmatic differentiation processes are in this, And how this may have formed continental crust on earth.we can thus, For the first time, Interpret the available data in a physically consistent manner.