magnesium diboride


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magnesium diboride

[mag′nē·zē·əm dī′bȯr‚īd]
(inorganic chemistry)
MgB2 A crystalline intermetallic compound, produced as a black powder, that becomes superconducting at the unusually high temperature of 39 K (-389°F; -234°C); melts at 800 °C. Also known as magnesium boride.
References in periodicals archive ?
CERN also explained the dual nature of Magnesium diboride (MgB2).
This is exactly what scientists at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN, are investigating: a new magnetic shield for spacecraft -superconducting magnesium diboride, or MgB₂.
We are developing a magnesium diboride superconducting coil to replace the gear box.
A small breakthrough came in 2001, when a well-known compound called magnesium diboride was discovered to superconduct at 40 kelvins.
Akimitsu, Superdonductivity at 39 K in magnesium diboride, Nature 410, 63-64(2001).
Researchers at the Aoyama-Gakuin University in Tokyo, in a letter to the journal Nature, reported finding superconducting properties in magnesium diboride, a compound of magnesium and boride.
5 Magnesium Diboride MgB2: A Simple Compound with Important Physical Properties (Michael Pissas).
Most remarkable--and inexplicable--was how warm the compound, magnesium diboride, could get before its superconductivity disappeared.
BEST) announced today the completion of its first 1000 meter unit length magnesium diboride (MgB2) superconducting wire, with a strand Je of up to 91 A/mmU at 4.
A simple, readily available material called magnesium diboride was found to conduct electricity without resistance at an unexpectedly high temperature, sparking a surge of research into the compound (159: 134 (*)).
We're excited to be getting the word out about the broad range of superconductor products we offer or are developing here in the Advanced Supercon business, including first-generation (BSCCO) and second-generation (YBCO) HTS wire and medium temperature superconductor (MTS) magnesium diboride (MgB2) wire.
Physicists in Japan have found superconductivity at a surprisingly high temperature in the simple, readily available metallic compound magnesium diboride.