magnetic bottle


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magnetic bottle

[mag′ned·ik ′bäd·əl]
(plasma physics)
A magnetic field used to confine or contain a plasma in controlled fusion experiments.
References in periodicals archive ?
The discovery of this high-confinement mode, with its coating of the magnetic bottle, allows a successful continuation of the fusion program toward an energy-producing source.
In 1968, he invented a new type of magnetic bottle to confine fusion plasmas called the Spherator, which according to his theoretical predictions, would reduce plasma turbulence under controlled conditions.
Paper topics include spectral and scattering theory for magnetic Schrodinger operators; magnetic Pauli and Dirac operators; magnetic operators on manifolds; microlocal analysis of magnetic Hamiltonians; random Schrodinger operators and quantum Hall effect; Ginsburg-Landau equation, supraconductivity, magnetic bottles; Bose-Einstein condensate, Gross-Pitaevski equation; and magnetic Lieb-Thirring inequalities, stability of matter.
Physicists have been working since the 1950s on making better "magnetic bottles," a problem which has been compared to holding jello (the plasma) with rubber bands (the magnetic field).
This field, in some respects, resembled the magnetic bottles now being designed to contain controlled fusion reactions.
This jumbled magnetic field takes the form of many short loops linking adjacent clumps of opposite polarity -- in effect, a magnetic "junkyard" thickly strewn with "magnetic bottles."
This is a popular account that begins with the building of the atom and hydrogen bombs and proceeds through Project Plowshare (artificial harbors, second Suez canal), the various ingenious efforts to contain hot and unstable plasmas (magnetic bottles and such), using lasers to ignite plasmas, Pons and Fleischmann's "cold fusion" experiments, Livermore Labs LASNEX computer simulations, "bubble fusion," and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), which was followed by ITER-Lite and which still beckons "after five decades of broken promises, lies, delusions, and self-deception." Seife concludes that the promise of a fusion reactor remains, as it had since the 1950s, 30 years away.
The high energy accelerator at Cern has been used to slam particles at solid targets at colossal speeds and the resulting antimatter has been collected in magnetic bottles.