magnetic field strength


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Related to magnetic field strength: magnetic flux density

magnetic field strength

[mag′ned·ik ′fēld ‚streŋkth]
(electromagnetism)
An auxiliary vector field, used in describing magnetic phenomena, whose curl, in the case of static charges and currents, equals (in meter-kilogram-second units) the free current density vector, independent of the magnetic permeability of the material. Also known as magnetic field; magnetic field intensity; magnetic force; magnetic intensity; magnetizing force.
References in periodicals archive ?
All of the students recognized the pattern in the data they collected (e.g., as the number of coils increases, the magnetic field strength increases; as the length of the solenoid increases, the strength of the magnetic field decreases).
When calculating the values of the magnetic field strength in the back of the core and the clamp prisms, magnetic flux density in the surface layer of the active steel, the magnetization characteristics of the relevant materials are used, which are selected from the tables [5], but to solve the problem it is advisable to present them in the form of functional dependencies.
Therefore, for plotting BH loci of magnetic fluids in the RMF, we need described measuring coils so that we can determine the components of magnetic flux density in both directions bx(t) and by(t) and magnetic field strengths [h.sub.x](t) and [h.sub.y](t).
In each case the resulting differential equation is solved numerically and the qualitative behavior of the system is described in terms of bifurcation diagrams relating the voltage and central deflection of the membrane as the magnetic field strength is changed.
They achieved a temperature span of 1.6K and 5K with a magnetic field strength of 0.3T and 0.95T respectively.
Figure 7 shows the transmission characteristics of the proposed sensor by tuning the TVS to change the magnetic field strength (H) ranging from 0 to 240 Oe with a step of 15 Oe.
The specific saturation magnetization, magnetic field strength, and magnetic induction of saponite, palygorskite, spondyle clay, [Fe.sub.3][O.sub.4], and synthesized MC samples are summarized in Table 2.
where [[mu].sub.0] is the magnetic permeability, M is the magnetization, and H is the magnetic field strength. The magnetization M is a function of H, approximated by
result; this may be due to the difference of intensity of magnetic field, wound dressing, and grouping method: higher magnetic field strength in our study (230 mT versus 180 mT); the wound dressing, respectively, was sterile gauze or hydrogel; we continuously observed wound healing process of each rat; however, only partially rats which executed every once in a while were observed in previous research [7]; the wound of partial diabetic rats was healed by second intention in our study.
Magnetic field strength was adjusted by regulating the voltage of power supply.
Fig.1 shows that the magnitude of horizontal velocity f' increases with increase in magnetic field strength, the situation for flow due to shrinking sheet is reverse as that for stretching sheet where usually the Lorentz force opposes the fluid flow.
The magnetic field strength for each system can be adjusted from either 0.1 to 3T, or 0.1 to 4.7T, or 0.1 to 7T according to the selected model and the researcher's requirements.