magnetic mine


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magnetic mine

[mag′ned·ik ′mīn]
(ordnance)
An underwater mine intended to be detonated when the hull of a passing vessel causes a change in the magnetic field at the mine.
References in periodicals archive ?
An illustration from a wartime book shows how a magnetic mine works.
They also dealt with aerial mines, particularly magnetic mines.
He discusses treaties such as the Washington Conference and Geneva Conference in 1927; the Kent and London classes and modernization; smaller cruisers; the HMS Exeter; the 1930 London Treaty and its cruisers and alternatives; the 1936 treaty, rearmament, and the Fiji class; and World War II designs and changes, including to radar and increased close-range anti-aircraft weapons, and the introduction of degaussing coils for magnetic mines.
HMS Blyth, which was launched in 2000 and weighs 485 tonnes, and is made from glass-reinforced plastic to avoid triggering magnetic mines.
In one classified "threat report", Gul is said to have ordered the planting of magnetic mines, to be hidden in snow on roads, where they would attach themselves to passing military vehicles and could then be remotely detonated to wreak havoc in Afghan cities.
During the Second World War, Mr Allingham worked on weapons development for aircraft maker De Havilland and helped neutralise German magnetic mines.
It protects ships from undersea magnetic mines, which detonate or activate when they detect magnetic fields.
Like himself, my father was a discharged regular soldier doing whatever work he could get, which during the war included the back-breaking labour of fitting degaussing cables around ships to repel magnetic mines.
The IDA emits a magnetic field that's designed to activate magnetic mines.
Research by Ole Krull found the bomber took off in fine weather to drop magnetic mines in the Baltic.
They included plans for dogs carrying magnetic mines to blow up tanks as they rolled across the border.