MRA

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MRA

(Mutual Recognition Arrangement) An agreement among entities whereby they accept the results of each other's evaluations. For example, the Common Critera Recognition Arrangement (CCRA) states that each member nation shall accept the results of the security tests of any other nation (see Common Criteria).
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References in periodicals archive ?
Follow-up magnetic resonance angiography shows significant improvement of cerebral lesions (arrow).
Factors in the technical quality of gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance angiography for pulmonary embolism in PIOPED III.
Fellner, "Magnetic resonance angiography of the carotid arteries using three different techniques: accuracy compared with intraarterial x-ray angiography and endarterectomy specimens," Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, vol.
(2) Computed tomography, selective angiography, and magnetic resonance angiography (4) can reveal the anomalous blood supply and confirm the diagnosis.
(2,3) MRI and magnetic resonance angiography are excellent for delineating soft-tissue growth, vascular lesions, and intracranial involvement.
Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) provides useful information concerning the 14,15 existence of offending vessels .Microvasculor decompression is treatment of choice besides medications and botulinum toxin.
On day six magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance angiography excluded acute infarction and dural venous sinus thrombosis but showed features suggestive of both intracranial hypotension and cortical oedema in the posterior regions of the brain (Figure 1).
Chapters on contrast agents and magnetic resonance angiography are included.
MRI with magnetic resonance angiography demonstrated the characteristic imaging findings of a carotid body tumour.
The researchers then randomly selected 1,000 participants aged 50-65 years from the third wave of the study (which took place during 2006-2008) and scanned them with magnetic resonance angiography. They found that 19 participants had aneurysms: 17 had one aneurysm each, 1 had two aneurysms and I had three aneurysms.
To estimate the extent that these patients' circulation was compromised, the researchers generated quantitative phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography (qMRA) flow maps for their internal and middle cerebral arteries.

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