magnetic tape storage

magnetic tape storage

[mag′ned·ik ¦tāp ‚stȯr·ij]
(computer science)
Storage of binary information on magnetic tape, generally on 5 to 10 tracks, with up to several thousand bits per inch (more than a thousand bits per centimeter) on each track.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since 2005, Anevia has been the exclusive supplier of IPTV based technology to the INA, enabling it to replace the magnetic tape storage it had started in 1995.
This areal recording density is equivalent to approximately 74 times the capacity of current mainstream coated magnetic tape storage media, and makes it possible to record more than 185 TB (terabytes)(2) of data per data cartridge(3).
The result was the development in 2001 of a 10-year projection for the future of magnetic tape storage. INSIC's work indicates that to remain an economically viable storage solution when compared to disk, tape capacity must grow at a rate comparable to future disk capacity growth on a cost-per-gigabyte basis.
The announcement coincides with IBM's 50th anniversary of magnetic tape storage that ushered in a new era of information processing.
Scientists traditionally use magnetic tape storage systems, which run into the hundreds of thousands of dollars, Brunelle said.
Among other items listed were: a pounds 616 magnetic tape storage unit, a trailer with canopy and spare wheel, worth pounds 1,093; a portable planer, pounds 112; socket sets ranging in value from pounds 34 to pounds 229; and a knee brace, pounds 521.
With rotating media such as magnetic tape storage, you're basically constrained to a serial type of reading.
Completed in 1953, the liquid freon-cooled RAYDAC contained 5,200 vacuum tubes, used acoustic delay-line memory and magnetic tape storage, and was one of the first digital computers to use error detection on all operations.
As data storage has evolved, other types of storage have followed magnetic tape storage and have led to the development of everything from real-time storage servers to the floppy disk and zip drives of the average PC.