magnetosomes


Also found in: Medical.

magnetosomes

[mag′ned·ə‚sōmz]
(microbiology)
Intracellular, membrane-bound iron mineral crystals, often magnetite, that enable magnetotactic bacteria to orient and move in the direction of the earth's magnetic field, in marine environments, magnetosomes may contain the iron sulfide mineral greigite.
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Magnetosomes were extracted from Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1 culture and purified according to the protocol proposed by Grunberg et al.
Magnetosome. Apart from artificially produced MNPs used in magnetic hyperthermia for killing tumor or pathogenic cells among in vitro and in vivo studies and in clinical trials, magnetosomes are also employed to kill cancer cells under an AMF.
Schuler, "Formation of magnetosomes in magnetotactic bacteria," Journal of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology, vol.
Another characteristic of magnetite crystals in bacterial magnetosomes is the tendency for the crystals to be elongated along the chain length in one of the [111] directions.
In nature, magnetotactic bacteria (MTBs) is a special kind of bacteria which have many micro magnetic particles named magnetosome in their bodies.
The process by which the magnetosomes are made and organized is not completely known [9].
Among the topics are the self-assembly and application of cellulosomal components, the protein-aided mineralization of inorganic nanostructures, bio-inspired biomolecular supramolecular self-assemblies and their applications, virus-like particles, restoring vision using microbial rhodopsins, and magnetosomes. Distributed in the US by ISBS.
Recent advance in micro-nano biorobotics has promised a potential remedy for this problem through the prospect of utilizing biocompatible flagellated magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) with nanometer-sized magnetosomes acting like computer-controlled medical microbots.
These (magnetotactic) bacteria have built-in natural compasses (magnetosomes) and they can be made to follow the pull from magnetic fields.
Magnetotactic bacteria (ABOVE), which are typically found in oxygen depleted water, grow tiny magnetic crystals called magnetosomes which they use for navigation.
The researchers focused their study on magnetotactic bacteria, which contain chains of magnetic crystals, called magnetosomes. They exist all over the globe, living in lake and pond sediments and in ocean coastal regions.
Among the amazing pictures generated by this technique is one of an actin-like filament, MamK, decorated with a chain of iron-containing magnetosomes in Magnetospirillum, a bacterium that can orient itself in relation to the earth's magnetic field.