mahogany


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mahogany,

common name for the Meliaceae, a widely distributed family of chiefly tropical shrubs and trees, often having scented wood. The valuable hardwood called mahogany is obtained from many members of the family; in America and Europe it is imported for cabinetmaking and similar uses. According to tradition it was first introduced to England from the West Indies when Sir Walter Raleigh had a mahogany table made for Queen Elizabeth I; the popularity of the wood increased steadily in the 18th cent. The different mahoganies vary in color from golden to deep red brown; most are close-grained and resistant to termites. The principal sources are the tropical American genus Swietenia (especially S. macrophylla, bigleaf mahogany, the present main source, and S. mahogani, West Indian mahogany, the historic main source) and the W African genus Khaya (especially K. ivorensis).

Another important member of the family is the West Indian cedar, or cigar-box tree (Cedrela odorata), whose scented, insect-repellent wood is commonly used for cigar boxes. The wood of the chinaberry tree (Melia azedarach) of Asia, introduced to (and now naturalized in) the S United States, Africa, and the Mediterranean as an ornamental, is also used for lumber. The name mahogany is also given to numerous unrelated tropical trees that provide similar lumber.

The mahogany family is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Sapindales.

mahogany

A straight-grained wood of intermediate density, pinkish to red-brown in color; used primarily for interior cabinetwork and decorative paneling. See also: Douglas fir

Mahogany

 

the reddish or brownish wood obtained from tropical trees that are often called mahogany trees. It is very sturdy and heavy and polishes well. The color of mahogany results from the presence of pigments, which are sometimes extracted for the manufacture of dyes. Most often used to obtain mahogany are American and African mahogany trees of the family Meliaceae and the sappanwood tree of the family Caesalpiniaceae from Southeast Asia (which has the fragrance of vio-lets). Mahogany is used for veneers in the furniture industry and for the interior decoration of ships, railroad cars, and apartments. The wood of the yew, black alder, and sequoia, which have the red color but not the other qualities of genuine mahogany, is sometimes called mahogany.


Mahogany

 

(Swietenia mahagoni), an evergreen tree of the family Meliaceae. It is up to 15 m high. The leaves are regular and paripinnate. The flowers are five-parted and in axillary panicles. The fruit is an elongated quinquevalvate capsule with numerous flat, winged seeds. The plant grows wild in the West Indies. The wood of the mahogany tree is hard, very durable, heavy, and attractive. It has grayish white sapwood and reddish brown heartwood. The wood is used primarily for artistic items, such as furniture and small turned products. The wood of many other tropical trees of the family Meliaceae (including other species of Swietenia and of the genera Khaya, Dysoxylum, and Carapa) and of other families of trees is also called mahogany.

mahogany

[mə′häg·ə·nē]
(botany)
Any of several tropical trees in the family Meliaceae of the Geraniales.
(materials)
The hard wood of these trees, especially the red or yellow-brown wood of the West Indies mahogany tree (Swietenia mahagoni).

mahogany

1. A straight-grained wood of intermediate density, pinkish to red-brown in color; found principally in the West Indies, and Central and South America. Used primarily for interior cabinetwork and decorative paneling.
2. Wood from a number of tropical species which resemble mahogany, generally classified as to origin, i.e., African mahogany, Philippine mahogany, etc.

mahogany


mahogany

1. any of various tropical American trees of the meliaceous genus Swietenia, esp S. mahagoni and S. macrophylla, valued for their hard reddish-brown wood
2. any of several trees with similar wood, such as African mahogany (genus Khaya) and Philippine mahogany (genus Shorea)
3. 
a. the wood of any of these trees
b. (as modifier): a mahogany table
4. a reddish-brown colour
References in periodicals archive ?
Mahogany is hardwood and has a natural rich-red stain.
MALASIQUI, Pangasinan - Police operatives here arrested two men for illegal logging after 72 pieces of mahogany lumber were confiscated from them in Barangay Cawayan Bogtong.
But if you are working with a budget, you get the same designs in mahogany.'
HSR brought its fine-dining restaurant, Mahogany Prime Steakhouse, to downtown in 2015.
But Laura was left looking like the Incredible Hulk with green skin, while Rosie came out a fetching shade of deepest mahogany. The friends, from Northallerton, North Yorks, dashed home and got back to their usual colour after 40 minutes in a hot shower.
The Brazilian mahogany tree, Swietenia macrophylla King (Meliaceae), is a native tree of Central and South American forests, where it also is known as Honduran or big-leaf mahogany, or simply mahogany (Snook 1998).
Summary: The incident took place when Shen Xiaoying was harvesting mahogany leaves.
The historic neighborhood shops are simple yet elaborate with memorabilia, mahogany wood, cement tiles and long central counters for service.
Mahogany Rise Primary School is serving up free and healthy lunches to hungry students, thanks to the Andrews Labor Government.
The model features a Black Label L package with a new Mahogany Red Venetian interior colour theme, laser-etched African mahogany trim and unique diamond stitching, among other upgrades.
KANSAS CITY -- Hallmark Cards Inc.'s Mahogany brand has introduced the Jill Scott Collection, a new offering of greeting cards featuring design, editorial and sound inspired by and created with Grammy Award-winning singer/songwriter Jill Scott.